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Derelict home covered in warning signs sells for $1.26m

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Derelict home covered in warning signs sells for $1.26m, 苏州夜生活, by .

Domain SHD Auction of run down 239 Lilyfield Rd, Lilyfield, Sydney which sold for $1,260,000 by auctioneer Craig Marshall from Savills Cordeau on Saturday the 22nd of July, 2017 Picture by FIONA MORRIS Damaged walls, broken floors and a collapsing ceiling weren’t enough to deter buyers from a rundown home in Sydney’s inner west on Saturday.
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Ten groups registered to bid on the three-bedroom Lilyfield home, on the market for the first time in almost 30 years.

The long-held investment property at 239 Lilyfield Road was one of more than 503 Sydney homes scheduled to go under the hammer on Saturday. By evening, Domain Group had recorded a 70 per cent clearance rate from 324 reported auctions.

The house was divided into two separate residences. While the front part, tenanted until recently, was in decent condition, the back section was a different story.

“It’s shocking, I’ve never seen anything like it,” said one would-be buyer, as she passed through rooms marked with signs warning people to watch their step and mind their head.

The three back rooms, last home to a hoarder about five years ago, had fallen into a derelict state.

Despite the challenges of the home, it took just seconds for auctioneer Craig Marshall of Savills Cordeau Marshall to take an opening bid of $1 million.

Bidding on the 180-square-metre block jumped up in $50,000 and $25,000 increments until hitting the $1.2 million reserve. Related: Sweet slice of urban pie in LilyfieldRelated: Lilyfield lures in north shore familiesRelated: A Lilyfield home full of flavour

From there it went up in $10,000 and $5000 jumps, with five bidders making offers before the hammer fell at $1.26 million – $60,000 above reserve.

It was well above the $88,000 vendor David Adams bought the property for in 1988.

The Gladesville resident and his daughter, Jane Ramsey, were delighted with the result. “We were always hoping for $1.2 million, to get over that is just great,” said Mr Adams. “[Prices in Lilyfield] have gone off the charts.”

Selling agent Thomas Skelly, also of Savills Cordeau Marshall, said it was an entry-level property for the suburb. Lilyfield’s median house price, now at $1.73 million, has risen 22.1 per cent in the last year.

He said the effort and cost of the extensive renovations required put off many young buyers interested in the property.

“People were talking of spending anywhere from $100,000 to $800,000 to fix it up, depending on the scope of work they wanted to do to the place,” he said.

“It was a bit too overwhelming for [young buyers], it’s really for somebody who is not afraid of renovating.”

That person was the opening bidder, a buyer from nearby Rozelle, who did not wish to be identified.

She was delighted to nab the home – which will be her third renovation project – after missing out at several auctions. She plans to respectfully renovate it before moving in.

In nearby Glebe, a tightly held three-bedroom terrace owned by the same family for more than a century, sold for $1,666,000.

Despite six parties registering to bid on the 130-square-metre corner block, it came down to a two-man race for 1 Darghan Street.

After an opening offer of $1.2 million was knocked back for being too low, a vendor bid of $1.6 million was made.

From there bidding jumped to $1.62 million, then $1.63 million and $1.65 million. It then dropped to smaller $5000 and $1000 increments until it sold.

Selling agent Eleanor Fitzpatrick of Ray White Glebe said the buyers were a local family who planned to renovate the original-condition home before moving in.

In Surry Hills, there were roughly 140 bids for a modern three-bedroom terrace at 619 Bourke Street before it sold under the hammer.

Bidding on the 158-square-metre block started at $2 million and went up in $50,000 and $25,000 increments, quickly passing the $2.2 million reserve, as six of seven registered bidders vied for the keys.

By the time bidding reached about $2.45 million it was down to just two parties, who tried to outbid each other with $1000 jumps until the property sold for $2,551,000 – $351,000 above reserve.

The home, which records show last traded for $454,000 in 1996, sold through Chris Chung of McGrath Edgecliffe to a young family upsizing from Redfern. Elsewhere in Sydney…

87 King Street, Manly Vale NSW 2093.Photo: Supplied

SOLD $2.91 million Manly Vale 87 King Street 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 4 car spaces

This 1200-square-metre block broke the suburb record by $10,000. Bidding on the home, which last traded for $1.74 million in 2013, opened at $2.4 million. It went up in $50,000 increments, quickly reaching the $2.7 million reserve. A young family relocating from the inner west outbid six other groups to secure the house. It sold through Mike Dunn of Clarke & Humel Property. The previous suburb record of $2.9 million was set earlier this year by 50 Sunshine Street, which had DA approval for a subdivision.

40 Eastern Avenue, Kingsford. Photo: Supplied.

SOLD $3.29 million Kingsford 40 Eastern Avenue 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car spaces

More than 200 people gathered for the auction of this renovated Californian bungalow, which opened with a bid of $2.85 million. While bidding went up in $50,000 increments to start, it dropped down to $5000 jumps before the hammer fell, as two of six registered bidders competed for the home. It sold for $290,000 above the $3 million reserve, through Doreen Wilson of Phillips Pantzer Donnelley. Records show it last traded for $2.15 million in 2010.

96 North West Arm Road, Gymea. Photo: Supplied

SOLD $1,085,000 Gymea 96 North West Arm Road 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1 car space

An upsizing young family outbid four other registered groups to nab this tightly held home owned by the same family for several generations. The auction for the 910-square-metre block in a bush setting opened with an offer of $950,000. Bidding went up in $10,000 jumps before dropping to smaller increments. It sold for the reserve price through Luke Jeffree of Century 21 Jeffree Real Estate, who showed about 70 groups through the property.

13 Douglas Street, Stanmore NSW 2048.Photo: Supplied

SOLD $1,705,000 Stanmore 13 Douglas Street 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car spaces

It was a two-man race for this freestanding home which records show last sold for $1,111,000 just over four years ago. Bidding started at the $1.6 million price guide and went up in $20,000 and $10,000 bids, quickly passing the $1.65 million reserve. The property was snapped up by an investor, who bought the home for their young child to live in when they grow up. It sold through Michael Field of Belle Property Annandale. The vendors plan to upsize to another home in the inner west.

Horn’s camp wants random drug testing as part of Pacquiao rematch

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Horn’s camp wants random drug testing as part of Pacquiao rematch, 苏州夜生活, by .

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The camp of WBO welterweight champion Jeff Horn will put random drug testing on the table as they continue negotiations for a rematch with Manny Pacquiao, with the second instalment increasingly likely to be held in in November.

After weeks of contemplation following his shock loss to the Queenslander at Suncorp Stadium in early July, the eight-division world champion looks certain to take up the option of a rematch, Top Rank’s Bob Arum telling Fairfax Media on Thursday that it was now just dates and venues holding up any announcement.

Horn returns to his Brisbane gym on Monday to begin training after a break following his victory over the Filipino great, who many thought would retire after losing a bloody and controversial unanimous decision through a dozen brutal rounds.

Horn’s trainer, Glenn Rushton, wasn’t entirely comfortable with the doping protocols for the first bout, which consisted of a standard post-bout urine sample. Neither fighter has ever returned a positive test.

But Rushton said they want to leave nothing to chance in the return, saying he would press the option of random pre-fight testing with promoters Duco Events before any deal was finalised. Drug testing has been an issue for Pacquiao in the past, most notably before his super fight with Floyd Mayweather. Even as recently as last month Mayweather was cagey when discussing Pacquiao and the notion of performance-enhancing drugs.

Rushton said they felt they would beat Pacquiao even more convincingly the second time, but he wants to ensure a level playing field for both men when they return to the ring for the sequel.

“It is something I’d bring up because what I don’t want is for them to go ‘The only way I can win this fight is if we are trying to get an unfair advantage’,” Rushton said. “I would certainly be very mindful of that. We want the big fights, but we want a level playing field.

“I’m very happy with any drug testing. I signed Jeff up for the WBC-VADA clean boxing program, which means you can be tested at any time. As an Olympian, we’re used to this sort of drug testing. We’ve had to do this many times. He’s clean as a whistle.

After hopes initially faded, with Horn calling out fighters such as Errol Spence on social media, the momentum for the rematch has grown in recent days. Arum has been speaking candidly and believes it will happen, with the fight likely to be Pacquiao’s final appearance in the ring as he juggles sport and his life as a Philippines senator.

Sydney and Melbourne are both in the running, even though the Queensland government has first and final rights of refusal. There had been reports of it taking place at Suncorp Stadium again, with giant air conditioners wheeled in to combat the heat, but Arum looks to have already ruled out any such move.

“We need to figure out where the fight will be,” Arum told ESPN. “The problem is we can’t have it outdoors again because of the weather [in Brisbane]. November is the summer there and it’s brutal to do it outdoors. We can’t do it. Even in July, which is their winter, it was pretty hot outdoors.”

Etihad Stadium remains a possibility, while Arum has been sweet-talked into a possible bout in Sydney by actor Nicole Kidman.

Rushton said he and Horn, who stands to make $2 million from the rematch, would be ready and waiting. “If we thought it was a fluke, we would be dodging it. But we’re saying let’s do it again, next time we’ll make it more convincing.

The Aboriginal choir that took Germany by storm

12.12.2018, Comments Off on The Aboriginal choir that took Germany by storm, 苏州夜生活, by .

It’s not every day you see a group of 30-odd Aboriginal women in colourful dress on the streets of Melbourne. But then it’s not every day 30-odd Aboriginal women get to attend the world premiere of a movie in which they star.
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The Song Keepers is a remarkable and enormously enjoyable documentary about a rather improbable concert tour. In 2015, the Central n Aboriginal Women’s Choir went to Germany, to sing the hymns that had been brought to this country in the 19th century by Lutheran missionaries. And they sang them in their own languages, Pitjantjatjara and Arrarnta, to a rapturous response.

“It’s simultaneously contradictory,” says director Naina Sen of her debut feature, which turns all the easy assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and occupying cultures on their head. “You do have all the colonial stuff, but you also have this preservation of language, and sacred music, and a culture that already has sacred songs taking on another culture’s sacred songs.”

This choir is a relic, the last of a once-thriving scene. Lutheran missionaries translated 53 German hymns within three years of arriving in the outback in 1877, and those hymns were sung – religiously, you might say – by a plethora of choirs right up to the 1970s. But when the men drifted into country music, the choirs first became women-only and then began to dwindle.

By 2006, when choirmaster Morris Stuart arrived on the scene, the remnants of just a few were all that remained. A black man from British Guyana, he arrived hoping to introduce them to African freedom songs. Instead, they introduced him to their hymns.

“We’re taking them back to Germany, like a boomerang,” Morris says in the film of the 2015 trip. “But this time, encased in these Aboriginal languages.”

The singing in the film is joyous, the women frequently hilarious, but there are serious moments of reflection, too, that challenge the idea that Christian missions did more harm than good.

Theresa Nipper recalls being taken in by the wife of her mission’s pastor after she was rejected by the elders of her tribe for being the daughter of a white man. “People don’t understand,” she says. “They just think the missionaries came and took over, brought their God with them, the Bible and all that. But they don’t see the other side of the missionaries. They saved a lot of children’s lives.”

Daphne Puntjina talks of giving birth to a son after her husband was killed, and how the old women wanted to take the child and kill it, as was customary. But a government worker and his wife took her and the child in, cared for them, kept them safe.

“I’ve thought about this a lot in my life,” she says. “I still strongly value and practise my culture. I understand that was one law in the old days. We don’t practise this culture any more.”

But it is Pantjiti McKenzie who best summarises the duality that survives and thrives in these women and their choir. “My culture and my faith: I believe in both ways and it makes me stronger,” she says. “On Saturdays I take the young girls out bush. I teach them traditional dance and singing. And then later, the choir gets together to sing hymns in the church. I don’t feel like I have to choose between them. They’re both equally important to me. We stand by both.”

It’s powerful stuff that perhaps points a way forward even as it seeks to keep the past alive. And it’s every bit as uplifting and inspiring as any hymn, whether you’re a believer or not.

“This is a story about a group of exceptional women,” says Sen. “It’s about strength and hope and survival – of people, of culture, of language. And at the end of the day it’s a joyous celebration of these women taking culture back to its source – but on their own terms.”

The Song Keepers is at the Melbourne International Film Festival on Sunday at 3.30pm and on August 8 and 14. Details: miff苏州夜网.au The choir also performs at the Melbourne Recital Centre on Monday at 7.30pm. melbournerecital苏州夜网.au

NRL Round 22: Gold Coast Titans v Brisbane BroncosPhotos

09.14.2019, Comments Off on NRL Round 22: Gold Coast Titans v Brisbane BroncosPhotos, 苏州夜生活, by .

NRL Round 22: Gold Coast Titans v Brisbane Broncos | Photos Titans player Ben Hunt crosses over to for a try which was later dis-allowed during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt
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Ben Hunt of the Broncos passes during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Ben Hunt of the Broncos kicks during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Kodi Nikorima of the Broncos crosses over to score during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Josh McGuire of the Broncos looks on during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Titans player Kane Elgey during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Korbin Sims of the Broncos during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Bronco’s players celebrate following the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Alex Glenn reacts with try-scorer Corey Oates during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Anthony Milford of the Broncos scores a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

“Rocketman” is seen in flight at half-time of the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Alex Glenn of the Bronco’s looks on during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

7. Titans player Jarrod Wallace during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

ronco’s player Alex Glenn tackles Titans player Anthony Don during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Titans player Ben Hunt crosses over to for a try which was later dis-allowed during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Kodi Nikorima of the Broncos during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Titans players are dejected during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Kodi Nikorima of the Broncos during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Kodi Nikorima of the Broncos during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Titans player Ben Hunt crosses over to for a try which was later dis-allowed during the Round 22 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos at Cbus Super Stadium in Robina on the Gold Coast, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

TweetFacebookPhotos from the NRL Round 22 game between the Gold Coast Titans and the Brisbane Broncos on the Gold Coast.

AFL round 20: Collingwood thump lowly Kangaroos

09.14.2019, Comments Off on AFL round 20: Collingwood thump lowly Kangaroos, 苏州夜生活, by .

AFL round 20: Collingwood thump lowly Kangaroos Kangaroos players leave the ground.
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Ben Brown of the Kangaroos (right) is treated for concussion.

Levi Greenwood of the Magpies (centre) is seen after sustaining an injury

Scott Thompson of the Kangaroos (left) and Alex Fasolo of the Magpies

Jamie Elliot of the Magpies.

Brodie Grundy

Jarryd Blair of the Magpies

Ben Brown of the Kangaroos is seen after suffering a concussion.

Brodie Grundy.

Steele Sidebottom of the Magpies (centre) and Ben Brown of the Kangaroos.

Taylor Adams.

Assistant coach of the Magpies Brenton Sanderson.

Alex Fasolo of the Magpies (left) and Daniel Nielson of the Kangaroos.

Levi Greenwood of the Magpies (centre).

Coach of the Kangaroos Brad Scott (third from right).

Ben Cunnington of the Kangaroos (right) and Tom Langdon of the Magpies (left)

Adam Treloar of the Magpies (left) and Andrew Swallow of the Kangaroos.

Daniel Wells of the Magpies (left) and Scott Thompson the Kangaroos.

Adam Treloar of the Magpies (left) and Andrew Swallow of the Kangaroos

Adam Treloar of the Magpies (right).

Brodie Grundy of the Magpies (left) and Braydon Preuss of the Kangaroos.

Adam Treloar.

Brodie Grundy of the Magpies (right) tackles Ben Brown of the Kangaroos (left) as he is transported off the ground after suffering a concussion.

Shaun Higgins of the Kangaroos (left) and Levi Greenwood of the Magpies wrestle.

Nick Larkey (left) and Taylor Garner (centre).

Shaun Higgins of the Kangaroos (left) and Levi Greenwood of the Magpies wrestle.

Jarryd Blair.

Todd Goldstein.

Magpies players Brayden Maynard (centre) and Brodie Grundy react after Grundy kicked a goal.

TweetFacebookCOLLINGWOOD

2.7 5.11 11.12 16.15 (111)

NORTH MELBOURNE

1.5 1.9 4.11 7.15 (57)

GOALS

Collingwood:Blair 3, Thomas 2, Adams 2, Fasolo, Treloar, Grundy, Moore, Wells, de Goey, Elliott, Howe, Phillips.North Melbourne: Ziebell 5, Mountford, Garner.

BEST

Collingwood:Treloar, De Goey, Maynard, Adams, Crisp, Scharenberg, Thomas, Blair.North Melbourne:Ziebell, Clarke, Mullett, Gibson.

UMPIRES

Pannell, Deboy, Gavine.

CROWD

33,394 at Etihad Stadium.

On a night North Melbourne honoured their 1977 premiership heroes, the grim reality of just how far the Kangaroos have fallen this season was laid bare, as they were thumped by a Collingwood outfit that is coming home with a wet sail.

The Roos snapped their seven-match losing streak last weekend against Melbourne, but that looks very much the exception after one of the most uninspiring performances by any AFL side in 2017.

It was made that much worse when North’s Coleman Medal fancy Ben Brown was carted off Etihad Stadium late in the second quarter after having his head slammed into the ground in a tackle by Collingwood ruckman Brodie Grundy.

The Pies big man will face scrutiny from the match review panel for the incident, which was reminiscent of one at the same venue a week ago, for which Geelong superstar Patrick Dangerfield was suspended.

Grundy pinned Brown’s arms as the Roo tried to dispose of the ball on the wing. Brown got rid of the ball as he was being taken to ground, but was not released by Grundy, his head thudding into the turf.

Brown looked to be knocked out as soon as he hit the ground, and it took more than five minutes for him to be stretchered off the arena.

North could also lose Ben Cunnington, with the midfielder likely to be assessed for a head-high bump that left Pies veteran Tyson Goldsack dazed.

The victory means Collingwood have three wins plus a draw against ladder-leaders Adelaide from their last four starts. Whether it is incumbent Nathan Buckley or someone else coaching the Pies next year, there is clearly plenty to work with.

There had been considerable public discussion during the week about the impact Daniel Wells was having at the Magpies, but bar a rousing goal late in the third quarter he had little effect on the match, with a heavily strapped quad a sign he might not have been fully fit against his former side. The Pies didn’t need him though, and nor did they miss skipper Scott Pendlebury. Instead Adam Treloar, Taylor Adams and Jordan De Goey ran riot through the midfield after quarter-time.

That’s not to say it was a vintage Magpies showing. They were just as culpable as the Roos in an error-riddled first quarter that served to remind you that this was 16th playing 13th. Wells started on the bench but even a player of his class was not immune to turning the ball over, with his first kick going straight to Cunnington – the North fans’ boos quickly turning to cheers.

The Pies appeared to have settled the better when Josh Thomas and Alex Fasolo kicked the first two goals of the game, but North remained well within striking distance after Lynden Dunn coughed it up deep in defence, gifting an opportunity to young Roo Declan Mountford, who duly converted.

The Pies did however click into gear in the second term, with their audacious decision making paying off.

Brayden Maynard’s run was a highlight, De Goey was again showing his class, and Darcy Moore looked threatening up forward.

The Pies kicked the only three goals of the quarter, not that North didn’t have chances. But, remarkably, despite getting the ball over the top of Collingwood’s press several times, the Roos repeatedly blew it inside 50, with Shaun Higgins, Cunnington and Shaun Atley all wasteful.

The poor ball use was overshadowed however by the Brown-Grundy incident, followed moments later by a clash between Jack Ziebell and Matt Scharenberg from which the North captain came off worse for wear. Then Levi Greenwood hobbled off with a suspected knee injury, and the injury list was threatening to challenge the goal tally for length.

Just as he did in the first half, Thomas kicked the first goal of the second half as well, and when Tom Phillips put one through from the pocket there was surely no way back for the Roos – who had kicked just one goal in more than a half, and were missing their best forward. Bereft of options, North sent their banged-up skipper to full-forward, where he kicked five goals. All of them however, came well after the game was lost.

NRL Round 22: Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks v Canberra RaidersPhotos

09.14.2019, Comments Off on NRL Round 22: Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks v Canberra RaidersPhotos, 苏州夜生活, by .

NRL Round 22: Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks v Canberra Raiders | Photos Jordan Rapana of the Raiders celebrates scoring a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding
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Wade Graham of the Sharks is tackled during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Josh Papalii of the Raiders is tackled by Chad Townsend of the Sharks during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Shannon Boyd of the Raiders in action during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Nick Cotric of the Raiders in action during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Luke Lewis of the Sharks during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Nick Cotric, Josh Hodgson and Jarrod Croker of the Raiders celebrate at full time of the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Nick Cotric, Josh Hodgson and Jarrod Croker of the Raiders celebrate at full time of the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Dejected Paul Gallen of the Sharks after the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Kurt Baptiste of the Raiders is tackled during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Jack Bird of the Sharks is tackled by Jarrod Croker of the Raiders during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Junior Paulo of the Raiders is tackled by Andrew Fifita of the Sharks during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Josh Hodgson of the Raiders makes a break during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Luke Lewis of the Sharks is tackled during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Wade Graham of the Sharks is tackled by Joseph Tapine of the Raiders during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Josh Papalii of the Raiders is tackled during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Blake Austin of the Raiders during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Gerard Beale of the Sharks is tackled during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Josh Hodgson of the Raiders and Paul Gallen of the Sharks during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

Jack Bird of the Sharks is injured during the Round 22 NRL match between the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and the Canberra Raiders at Southern Cross Group Stadium in Sydney, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Craig Golding

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Country Victorian tyre dump sold to Panama internet marketing company

09.14.2019, Comments Off on Country Victorian tyre dump sold to Panama internet marketing company, 苏州夜生活, by .

An aerial shot from 2014 of the Stawell tyre dump, which holds around 9 million tyres. Photo: Boomerang AllianceA shadowy offshore internet marketing company based in the tax haven of Panama now has control of a toxic dump of 9 million used tyres considered a huge fire risk in the state’s west.
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The notorious Stawell tyre stockpile, one of the world’s biggest, has largely sat dormant for nearly a decade, despite major environmental concerns and repeated orders for it to be cleaned up.

Anger in the community has reached boiling point, as repeated inaction finally led the Environment Protection Authority last week to declare it would take charge of the dump unless the fire danger was reduced. If fully ignited, it could burn for months.

The previous owner had promised residents that it would rid the country town of the dangerous mass of rubber using a controversial recycling process known as pyrolysis, which involves breaking down the tyres at high temperatures.

However that plan has not reached fruition and with the threat of action looming, Fairfax Media can reveal that ownership of the site has been transferred in recent months to an overseas company known as “Internet Marketing Solutions Corp”.

From Stawell to PanamaA title search shows the transfer of the Saleyards Road property by the previous owner Used Tyre Recycling Corporation was completed on June 8.

No ACN or n address is listed for Internet Marketing Solutions Corp on the land title. The company is based in the central American country of Panama.

Panama company records show Internet Marketing Solutions Corp was registered in 2010 as a “sociedad anonima” or anonymous society, a form of private corporation which protects the identity of shareholders.

Directors listed on the company’s documents are linked to hundreds of other entities in Panama.

The sole director of the Used Tyre Recycling Corporation, Matthew Starr, said he was not connected with Internet Marketing Solutions Corp in any way and had completed the deal in New York City earlier this year.

Internet Marketing Solutions Corp bought the dump because they wanted to focus on developing rubber-based products, he said.

“I have never been to Panama and can’t speak or understand any Spanish,” he said.

It appears no money changed hands. On the land title, the property was transferred as a “desire to make a gift”.

Dr Starr said the deal was backended, with an agreement that his company would recycle Internet Marketing Solutions Corp’s tyres at a plant still planned for a neighbouring property.

The skyline of Panama City in Panama. Photo: Susana Gonzalez

‘They don’t care’Stawell resident Allan Cooper, 65, said the community had been worried about the tyre stockpile for at least 10 years, after the site’s then-owner Motorway went bust in 2008.

He lives on Longfield Street, about one kilometre away from the dump, and had major concerns about the possibility of the town being blanketed with toxic smoke if it were to go up in flames.

“If it started the whole town would be polluted with smoke,” he said. “There’s no way known you could get everybody out that quickly and it won’t take long to start up once it goes.”

Mr Cooper said the town was sick of the buckpassing that had taken place in recent years between the owners, the EPA, local council and state government, and just wanted something done.

“If it was in Melton, closer to Melbourne, they’d be doing something about,” he said. “They would have that much money poking at it. But they don’t care.”

Environmental groups have previously described the dump as a “Hazelwood waiting to happen”. The CFA has assessed the site as a “very high fire” risk, with the potential for catastrophic consequences for the town of Stawell.

Panama company records for Internet Marketing Solutions Corp.

Nine million tyresEnvironmental group Boomerang Alliance, which has advocated for stricter controls on tyre dumping, estimated there were 9 million tyres in the stockpile.

“Every year it stays there, the greater the chance of a massive fire,” said Boomerang Alliance director Jeff Angel.

Lax regulation had allowed the stockpile to grow, he said, as unscrupulous collectors undercut legitimate recyclers with lower rates and then dumped the tyres without fear of reprisal.

He said the problem was improving as state governments tightened their laws, while major tyre brands also had begun sending their used tyres to genuine recyclers.

“However, we’ve got this enormous legacy problem at Stawell,” he said.

EPA chief executive Nial Finegan said there was a long history with Used Tyre Recycling Corporation trying to get them to comply with various notices.

The EPA would seek to recover costs from the owners if it had to take control of the dump and reduce the risk, he said. The current owners have until Wednesday to explain why the EPA shouldn’t take charge.

“If the Environment Protection Authority is stepping in there is a real risk to the community,” he said.

Dr Starr said his company had stopped owning the dump on March 30, before the EPA had slapped the tyre yard with three statutory demands.

Any delays were caused by documentation having to be translated between Spanish and English and then approved, he said.

The company had previously tried to get a permit for a pyrolysis tyre recycling plant but claimed to be slowed down by red tape.

Dr Starr said the company had spent large amounts of money and had improved the site substantially since taking over in 2015.

“It appears that the EPA are overreacting at Stawell given the recent paper recycling dump fire in Coolaroo that took weeks to put out,” he said.

American denies Bolt golden end to solo career – then bows to him

09.14.2019, Comments Off on American denies Bolt golden end to solo career – then bows to him, 苏州夜生活, by .

It should never have come to this. The perfect athlete has left his imperfect sport, in the most imperfect of ways to the least perfect athlete.
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The world’s greatest sprinter, Usain Bolt, was beaten in his last race by twice banned drug cheat Justin Gatlin, his pantomime rival.

Bolt was allowed to be beaten … just not by Gatlin. The best the sport has seen should not leave that sport beaten at the last by a cheat. It was OK for him to be beaten – he was in fact, as Christian Coleman also beat him over the line – just not by someone who embodied the worst of the sport.

It should never have come to this because Gatlin – the new 100m world champion – should not have been racing. Twice banned for drugs he should have been banned for life for his cheating.

In 2001, Gatlin was banned for two years after testing positive for an amphetamine found in attention deficit disorder (ADD) medicine. That suspension was later cut to a year.

In 2005, he won the 100m world championship gold, then a year later was banned again, this time for eight years after testing positive for testosterone. The ban was halved because he co-operated with authorities.

The new IAAF head Seb Coe admitted previously to being “queasy” at the thought of an athlete who’d served serious doping bans winning gold and felt life should mean life for dopers.

Today Coe should feel sick. When he made those comments he could still rely on Bolt to deflect attention from the sport’s dirty open secret that dopers are commonplace.

This time there is no distraction or hiding from it. Gatlin, the villainous counterpoint to Bolt, has beaten him. The Roadrunner has been caught, Coyote has won.

The English crowd booed and hissed Gatlin each time he stepped on the track. Gatlin sought to be dignified and above the boos, which was quite some feat to project grace and dignity for actions that lacked both and for which there has been no remorse.

Bolt was more conciliatory.

“I told him congrats and well done,” he added. “He’s done his time over the years. Tonight he was the better man.” Ahem, faster yes, better?

Bolt was beaten by a better and faster man on the night – Christian Coleman. Bolt was beaten to the line by Gatlin and Coleman and so had to accept bronze, a colour it is doubtful he was aware medals came in.

Gatlin ran 9.92s, Coleman 9.94s and Bolt 9.95s. After a slow start the Jamaican ran out of track to fold in the two Americans.

“I’ve proved to the world I’m one of the greatest athletes,” said Bolt. “I’ve done my part as an athlete, to uplift the sport and show it’s getting better. I did my best.”

Bolt had won everything at a major meet since 2008 other than on those occasions such as in 2011 when he beat himself when he false started. He had never been beaten over this distance in an open field in a world championships or Olympics.

So that’s good bye. Usain Bolt has run his last individual race.

What does life look like after Bolt? Does the new world champion return the sport to its grubby past and to a narrative where performances were punctured like needle pricks with stories of doping and corruption.

Maybe the new king of the sport is South African long sprint champ Wayde Van Neikerk. He could yet achieve things like Bolt and so be the torch bearer of his sport.

Van Niekerk has the athletic capacity but to compare Bolt to Van Neikerk is to compare Shane Warne to Glenn McGrath. Both were great but one thrilled, entertained and transcended, the other was Glenn McGrath.

The sport will be different without Bolt because it was different before him.

The reason he will not be readily replaced is he was different from all others and that was not just about his speed.

Bolt stood above his sport.

AFL Round 20: Greater Western Sydney Giants and Melbourne DemonsPhotos

08.14.2019, Comments Off on AFL Round 20: Greater Western Sydney Giants and Melbourne DemonsPhotos, 苏州夜生活, by .

AFL Round 20: Greater Western Sydney Giants v Melbourne Demons | Photos Nathan Jones of the Demons in action during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photos: AAP Image/Lukas Coch
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Zac Williams of the Giants in action during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Alex Neal-Bullen of the Demons (right) reacts after loosing the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Brett Deledio of the Giants in action during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Shane Mumford of the Giants (right) fights for the ball with Max Gawin of the Demons during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Callan Ward of the Giants in action during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Phil Davis of the Giants (right) fights for the ball with Jack Watts of the Demons during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Brett Deledio of the Giants (right) celebrates after scoring a goal during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Brett Deledio of the Giants (right) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Christian Salem of the Demons (left) fights for the ball with Zac Williams of the Giants during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Nathan Jones of the Demons fights for the ball with Matthew Kennedy of the Giants (left) during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Alex Neal-Bullen of the Demons celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Christian Salem of the Demons (left) fights for the ball with Dylan Shiel of the Giants during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Shane Mumford of the Giants celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Max Gawin of the Demons (left) fights for the ball with Shane Mumford of the Giants during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Josh Kelly of the Giants (left) fights for the ball with Alex Neal-Bullen of the Demons during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Nathan Jones of the Demons fights for the ball with Matthew Kennedy of the Giants (left) during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Callan Ward of the Giants celebrates after scoring a goal during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Brett Deledio of the Giants in action during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Max Gawin of the Demons (left) fights for the ball with Shane Mumford of the Giants during the Round 20 AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants and the Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval in Canberra, Saturday, August 5, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

TweetFacebookPhotos from the action on field during the AFL Round 20 match between Greater Western Sydney Giants and Melbourne Demons at Manuka Oval

Bowna nurse Trish Ryan’s turns grief into a life-saving gift

08.14.2019, Comments Off on Bowna nurse Trish Ryan’s turns grief into a life-saving gift, 苏州夜生活, by .

NO PLACE LIKE HOME: Siblings Anita and Manoj Tamang completing their homework at Noble House after the death of their father and with their mother living in a remote part of Nepal, unable to care for them.When Trish Ryan’s daughter died, she refused to sit and grieve at home.
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Instead the nurse and mother of fourgathered up all the love in her heartand took it across the world to an orphanage in Nepal.

Meg was just 23 when complications from spina bifida claimed her life in 2003.

She had been studying a Bachelor of Education at Charles Sturt University and was a popular teacher’s aid atschools in the district.

It was the brave young woman’s dream to help disadvantaged children once she finished her training.

As the first anniversary of Meg’s death loomed, the grieving mother booked a flight to Nepal–she’d longed to volunteer there since her early nursing days.

When Mrs Ryan arrived at the small orphanage in Bagmati, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, she discovered a deplorable place overflowing with malnourished children dressed in rags.

Managed by a corrupt administration, staff were often forced to beg for food on the streets and there was an open sewage drain running through the house.

On her returnto , Mrs Ryanralliedresidents inher local farming community of Bowna whobegan fundraising in earnest.

Meg’s Children was founded in 2005 and has been tranforming the lives of disadvantaged children in Nepal ever since.

Initially the charitable trust supported the children from Bagmati orphanage and their house mothers Nanda and Bibechana to be relocated to a new home in Bhaktapur with Mrs Ryantravellingback regularly to oversee its operation.

From that first move to create a stable and loving home for vulnerable children, the focus of the charity has expanded with education its underlying ethos.

Six of that original band of childrenare now at university`and today the Meg’s Children Trust operates in partnership with Siddhi Memorial Hospitaland a dedicated group of Albury volunteers.

GIFT OF LIFE: Nurse and mother of four Trish Ryan has spent more than a decade helping destitute children in Nepal after the death of her daughter Meg, who was 23.

It has truly been a labour of love for Mrs Ryan whofunds all her own travel costs.

Fundraising is the lifeline to a brighter future.

Melbourne businessman Mike Coen was so moved by her efforts he has pledged to raise $100,000 in an epic walk from August 21.

Mrs Ryan said it was this type of supportthat would continue to education children in the hope they would be leaders ofthe future andhelp Nepal out of its poverty.

Looking back on her journey during the past decade, Mrs Ryan said in many ways it was meant to be.

She knows Meg would approve of the legacy in her name.

“I think she would be100 per cent impressed and she would also say don’t ever give up – keep on going,” Mrs Ryan said.

Matty Johnson and Sophie Monk given downgraded Bachelor mansion

08.14.2019, Comments Off on Matty Johnson and Sophie Monk given downgraded Bachelor mansion, 苏州夜生活, by .

Amid massive financial woes, Channel Ten is said to be tightening the purse strings in more ways than allegedly rationing avocados and coffee.
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While filming The Bachelor and The Bachelorette this year, Matty Johnson and Sophie Monk were put up in a $1.7 million, four-bedroom, three-bathroom house with an indoor pool in Dural, north-west Sydney.

Not too shabby for the marketing director, 30, and the former Bardot singer and actress, 37.

But it’s a far cry from the lavish $4.1 million five-bed, four-bath mansion with two outdoor pools and its very own lake with featured fountain that last year’s The Bachelor Richie Strahan and The Bachelorette Georgia Love lived in.

Strahan and Love had more than 20,000 square metres of sprawling estate to roam around on as they pondered who they would date and dump, while Johnson and Monk were confined to a mere 1008 square metres.

Channel Ten entered into voluntary administration in June, but a spokeswoman for The Bachelor denied the house move had anything to do with budget cuts.

“It just suited the needs of the production better this season … and provided a different outlook for filming,” they added, despite the former mansion in Middle Dural being closer to where the unlucky-in-love contestants are based at Abbott Place, Glenorie, while the new residence is over 15 kilometres away.

The reality series is no stranger to a move. Last year they upped sticks and left the heritage-listed waterfront estate, Clifton, in leafy Hunters Hill, that was rumoured to have cost production $25,000 a week in rent.

The news of the house downgrade amid reports last week that contestants’ living conditions left a lot to be desired, with food restricted.

A spokeswoman labelled the story as “ridiculous”, and

rationed avocados were put down to “seasonal shortages”.

When it came to “uncomfortable” bunk beds, an insider told Fairfax Media: “I think that’s probably all up to personal interpretation,” while shared living quarters have helped past contestants form strong friendships that have continued long after the show had wrapped.

Although season five is rating higher than any other for Ten, the series has not been without its problems.

The winner of Johnson’s heart was photographed with him last year while filming the finale in Thailand by two well-known Sydney paparazzi.

Ten won an injunction at the NSW Supreme Court to stop the paparazzi from publishing the 318 photographs or disclosing the identities of the home visits and the finale – another costly move amid the ailing broadcaster’s financial struggles.

Do you know more? Email [email protected]苏州夜总会招聘.au.

Don’t wish too hard. We’ve got the low wage growth we sought

08.14.2019, Comments Off on Don’t wish too hard. We’ve got the low wage growth we sought, 苏州夜生活, by .

HOWARD AFR 070504 MELB PIC BY JESSICA SHAPIRO… Prime Minister John Howard and Joe Hockey, Federal Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations, held a press conference this afternoon to announce changes to the workchoices package. Story by Eli Greenblat. AFR FIRST USE ONLY PLEASE!!! SPECIALX 64658 HOWARD AFR 070504 MELB PIC BY JESSICA SHAPIRO… Prime Minister John Howard and Joe Hockey, Federal Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations, held a press conference this afternoon to announce changes to the workchoices package. Story by Eli Greenblat. AFR FIRST USE ONLY PLEASE!!! SPECIALX 64658
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HOWARD AFR 070504 MELB PIC BY JESSICA SHAPIRO… Prime Minister John Howard and Joe Hockey, Federal Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations, held a press conference this afternoon to announce changes to the workchoices package. Story by Eli Greenblat. AFR FIRST USE ONLY PLEASE!!! SPECIALX 64658

It’s better sometimes when we don’t get to touch our dreams.

The incoming Coalition government wanted low wage growth, badly.

Within weeks of taking office in 2013 employment minister Eric Abetz upbraided “weak-kneed employers” whom he said were unable to “just say no”.

They were all for the carrot, but saw no role for the stick.

He led by example, abolishing the Commonwealth guidelines for cleaners employed in places such as Parliament House. It meant that when their contracts expired the workers who cleaned his office would get just $17.49 an hour (the minimum wage) instead of the $22.02 they had previously been guaranteed; an absolute pay cut of 20 per cent.

He offered defence force staff just 1.5 per cent a year, less than inflation and the least in living memory. He said he expected other public servants to get the same or less. He offered staff in his own department just 0.5 per cent, along with cuts in conditions. Several agencies offered nothing – pay rises of zero per cent – with government endorsement.

The worst thing about his call to arms was the timing. Wage growth was in free-fall. A year earlier it had been 4.3 per cent. When he spoke, it was below inflation at 2.5 per cent, it’s now below inflation at 1.9 per cent.

The previous Coalition government, led by John Howard, had done much of the work for him. Its WorkChoices legislation made it harder for unions to win pay rises. With employees in many workplaces forced to negotiate individually, employers with the power to hire and fire had the upper hand.

It didn’t matter much while the economy was booming. Employers desperate to find staff willingly bid up rates. But when things turned down, the upper hand became decisive.

By then much of the WorkChoices infrastructure had been stripped away, but so too had much of the union infrastructure. Membership fell further. In 1996, when Howard took office, 31 per cent of the n workforce was represented by a union. The latest figure is 15 per cent.

Another of his changes made it hard for unions to exercise power even when they found a seat at the table. Shortly after becoming prime minister he introduced the Temporary Work Skilled Subclass 457 visa, otherwise known as the 457.

Employers facing shortages could take in an unlimited number of skilled workers from overseas. They’d have to be paid n wages, but the ability of employers to get them in rather than bid up n wages left unions with little to bargain with.

Even without 457s, ns were facing competition from overseas.

The boom in Chinese manufacturing which took off under Howard made n prices uncompetitive. The higher dollar, pushed up by China’s demand for n raw materials, made n manufacturers even less competitive.

White-collar work, including answering phones and providing legal and accountancy advice, can be done more cheaply overseas. Technology is also making traditional workers expendable. Uber drivers do what taxi drivers did for half the price. Self-driving taxis and trucks will do it for even less.

It isn’t all bad. Low wage growth appears to have helped n businesses keep workers on during the global financial crisis. It has meant the government has spent less than it expected on wages and wage-linked pensions, as well as getting less than it expected from bracket creep.

But it gives the people on those slowly-growing wages a sense that they need to be careful. We are saving far more than we used to, and switching jobs less often. We’re battening down the hatches, hanging on, in the hope that something picks up.

Peter Martin is economics editor of The Age.

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Going postal: how the same-sex marriage vote could work

08.14.2019, Comments Off on Going postal: how the same-sex marriage vote could work, 苏州夜生活, by .

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – FEBRUARY 22: Draped in the rainbow flag and enjoying the atmosphere at the Mardi Gras fair day on February 22, 2015 in Sydney, . (Photo by James Alcock/Fairfax Media)Immigration Minister Peter Dutton bills it as the “next best option”. Labor leader Bill Shorten calls it a “delaying mechanism from the dinosaurs of the right wing of the Liberal Party”, while marriage equality advocates are weighing up a legal challenge.
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Welcome to the postal vote for same-sex marriage.

Dutton first floated a postal plebiscite in March, arguing it was the “sensible approach” because the Senate had blocked the government’s preferred plan to hold a compulsory vote on the issue. The postal idea, which is supported by Queensland’s Liberal National Party, is based on the understanding that if the vote was voluntary, the government would not need Parliament’s approval to go ahead.

Now with the very real prospect of pro-marriage equality Liberal MPs crossing the floor to bring on a vote on same-sex marriage and a showdown party room meeting set for next Monday, the postal vote is looking more like a live option as a way to keep the peace.

But is it a viable compromise? Or will it end up creating more problems than it solves?

is used to voting in person at a polling booth. But the n Electoral Commission has plenty of experience conducting postal votes. On top of optional postal voting for people overseas or in remote areas during regular elections, the AEC arranged a postal vote for Queenslanders on council amalgamations in 2007.

However, the last time the AEC organised a postal vote at a national level was in 1997 to elect delegates for the constitutional convention on the republic. A recent paper prepared by the parliamentary library estimates that in today’s dollars this cost around $40 million (compared to the estimated $160 million needed to conduct a compulsory plebiscite). The bulk of the funds went on the production and postage of voting papers, advertising, divisional office costs and public information.

It wasn’t a speedy process. The non-compulsory vote took more than three months from the time prime minister John Howard announced the election dates to the declaration of the results. This included two weeks for the ballot papers to be mailed and about a month for people to send them back to the AEC. It’s arguable a postal vote for same-sex marriage would not need as long – as it is asking a more simple question and does not need a nomination period for delegates.

Surprisingly (if you look at the way he avoided answering questions on it this week), Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull was mightily opposed to the postal approach in 1997, as leader of the republic’s “yes” campaign. In an opinion piece for The n, he said postal voting “flies in the face of n democratic values”.

According to the article, unearthed by Crikey, Turnbull raised concerns about the high number of people who change their address between elections. “These voters will not get their ballot papers. Not unless they ring up and make a special request, and who will get around to doing that?”

Turnbull also said young people and Indigenous people in remote communities were at greater risk of being disenfranchised because they tend to move more often. Young people were certainly less likely to vote in the 1997 ballot than any other age group. As a percentage of those enrolled in their age group, only 34 per cent of 18-25 year-olds participated in the postal vote. This compares to 50 per cent of 46-55 year-olds and 59 per cent of those over 56.

It’s also true that young people are less involved in elections, generally. In the 2016 election, 95 per cent of eligible voters participated, compared to 86.7 per cent of eligible 18-24 year-olds. There are fears among same-sex marriage advocates that given support for marriage equality is more pronounced among younger people, a postal vote will harm the “yes” camp’s chances if there was a vote.

Monash University senior lecturer in n politics Nick Economou??? isn’t convinced by this argument. He notes that because same-sex marriage is an issue that young people care about, they are more likely to want to vote. And even though they do live in a digital world, they are also more than capable of using a pen and an envelope (it’s not that hard).

“I have full confidence young people would be engaged,” Dr Economou says.

In his 1997 tirade against postal voting, Turnbull also warned that a postal ballot lacked secrecy and integrity. “In the voting booth each of us votes alone. Without the pressure of husband or wife, parent or child. When the postal ballot arrives in the letter box how many people will be compelled to vote one way or other by a strong??-willed friend or family member?”

Economou similarly notes there are no real protections against one person in a household simply filling out papers for others they live with, perhaps with the more benign intention of helping rather than bullying.

Another significant question mark hovering over the postal vote is its ability to deliver decisive victory or closure. Non-compulsory voting means less people – of any age group – will vote. In 1997, just 47 per cent of voters sent their ballot papers back.

As Sydney Liberal MP and same-sex marriage opponent Craig Kelly told Fairfax Media last month: “My concern would be that a voluntary postal vote may not have the authority of a compulsory vote at the ballot box. It would be very easy for one group to say they would boycott it and not recognise the result.”

So, beyond its proponents within the Coalition, it is difficult to find fans of the postal vote.

Those who are against same-sex marriage, such as the n Christian Lobby, say the postal vote is an “option that should be canvassed” – given the plebiscite was blocked in the Senate (by Labor and the Greens). But the lobby’s managing director Lyle Shelton adds his preferred option is for the government to “just show some resolve” and take its plebiscite policy to the next election.

The “yes” camp – who vociferously opposed the idea of a compulsory plebiscite – don’t even want to entertain the idea of a voluntary one. ns for Equality executive director Tiernan Brady says a postal vote sends a “terrible message” about LGBTI ns.

“I don’t think the dignity of one group of people should be subject to something that’s written on the back of an envelope.”

There is also talk of a legal challenge, even before the precise details of the proposal are made public. Marriage equality advocate Rodney Croome??? told The n he was seeking legal advice on the whether the non-compulsory vote would still need the authority of Parliament, given it would involve the spending of public funds.

Melbourne University constitutional expert Adrienne Stone says the government may have the capacity to spend money on the postal vote under the heading of “ordinary services of government”. Professor Stone said it could potentially be argued the government was legitimately testing the opinion of the people as part of policy formulation.

But Stone, the director of the Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies, said this is still a new area of law, in the wake of the High Court’s 2014 school chaplains case that ruled government spending should be subject to parliamentary oversight.

“You can bet your bottom dollar there is going to be a challenge.”