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Derelict home covered in warning signs sells for $1.26m

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Derelict home covered in warning signs sells for $1.26m, 苏州夜生活, by .

Domain SHD Auction of run down 239 Lilyfield Rd, Lilyfield, Sydney which sold for $1,260,000 by auctioneer Craig Marshall from Savills Cordeau on Saturday the 22nd of July, 2017 Picture by FIONA MORRIS Damaged walls, broken floors and a collapsing ceiling weren’t enough to deter buyers from a rundown home in Sydney’s inner west on Saturday.
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Ten groups registered to bid on the three-bedroom Lilyfield home, on the market for the first time in almost 30 years.

The long-held investment property at 239 Lilyfield Road was one of more than 503 Sydney homes scheduled to go under the hammer on Saturday. By evening, Domain Group had recorded a 70 per cent clearance rate from 324 reported auctions.

The house was divided into two separate residences. While the front part, tenanted until recently, was in decent condition, the back section was a different story.

“It’s shocking, I’ve never seen anything like it,” said one would-be buyer, as she passed through rooms marked with signs warning people to watch their step and mind their head.

The three back rooms, last home to a hoarder about five years ago, had fallen into a derelict state.

Despite the challenges of the home, it took just seconds for auctioneer Craig Marshall of Savills Cordeau Marshall to take an opening bid of $1 million.

Bidding on the 180-square-metre block jumped up in $50,000 and $25,000 increments until hitting the $1.2 million reserve. Related: Sweet slice of urban pie in LilyfieldRelated: Lilyfield lures in north shore familiesRelated: A Lilyfield home full of flavour

From there it went up in $10,000 and $5000 jumps, with five bidders making offers before the hammer fell at $1.26 million – $60,000 above reserve.

It was well above the $88,000 vendor David Adams bought the property for in 1988.

The Gladesville resident and his daughter, Jane Ramsey, were delighted with the result. “We were always hoping for $1.2 million, to get over that is just great,” said Mr Adams. “[Prices in Lilyfield] have gone off the charts.”

Selling agent Thomas Skelly, also of Savills Cordeau Marshall, said it was an entry-level property for the suburb. Lilyfield’s median house price, now at $1.73 million, has risen 22.1 per cent in the last year.

He said the effort and cost of the extensive renovations required put off many young buyers interested in the property.

“People were talking of spending anywhere from $100,000 to $800,000 to fix it up, depending on the scope of work they wanted to do to the place,” he said.

“It was a bit too overwhelming for [young buyers], it’s really for somebody who is not afraid of renovating.”

That person was the opening bidder, a buyer from nearby Rozelle, who did not wish to be identified.

She was delighted to nab the home – which will be her third renovation project – after missing out at several auctions. She plans to respectfully renovate it before moving in.

In nearby Glebe, a tightly held three-bedroom terrace owned by the same family for more than a century, sold for $1,666,000.

Despite six parties registering to bid on the 130-square-metre corner block, it came down to a two-man race for 1 Darghan Street.

After an opening offer of $1.2 million was knocked back for being too low, a vendor bid of $1.6 million was made.

From there bidding jumped to $1.62 million, then $1.63 million and $1.65 million. It then dropped to smaller $5000 and $1000 increments until it sold.

Selling agent Eleanor Fitzpatrick of Ray White Glebe said the buyers were a local family who planned to renovate the original-condition home before moving in.

In Surry Hills, there were roughly 140 bids for a modern three-bedroom terrace at 619 Bourke Street before it sold under the hammer.

Bidding on the 158-square-metre block started at $2 million and went up in $50,000 and $25,000 increments, quickly passing the $2.2 million reserve, as six of seven registered bidders vied for the keys.

By the time bidding reached about $2.45 million it was down to just two parties, who tried to outbid each other with $1000 jumps until the property sold for $2,551,000 – $351,000 above reserve.

The home, which records show last traded for $454,000 in 1996, sold through Chris Chung of McGrath Edgecliffe to a young family upsizing from Redfern. Elsewhere in Sydney…

87 King Street, Manly Vale NSW 2093.Photo: Supplied

SOLD $2.91 million Manly Vale 87 King Street 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 4 car spaces

This 1200-square-metre block broke the suburb record by $10,000. Bidding on the home, which last traded for $1.74 million in 2013, opened at $2.4 million. It went up in $50,000 increments, quickly reaching the $2.7 million reserve. A young family relocating from the inner west outbid six other groups to secure the house. It sold through Mike Dunn of Clarke & Humel Property. The previous suburb record of $2.9 million was set earlier this year by 50 Sunshine Street, which had DA approval for a subdivision.

40 Eastern Avenue, Kingsford. Photo: Supplied.

SOLD $3.29 million Kingsford 40 Eastern Avenue 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car spaces

More than 200 people gathered for the auction of this renovated Californian bungalow, which opened with a bid of $2.85 million. While bidding went up in $50,000 increments to start, it dropped down to $5000 jumps before the hammer fell, as two of six registered bidders competed for the home. It sold for $290,000 above the $3 million reserve, through Doreen Wilson of Phillips Pantzer Donnelley. Records show it last traded for $2.15 million in 2010.

96 North West Arm Road, Gymea. Photo: Supplied

SOLD $1,085,000 Gymea 96 North West Arm Road 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1 car space

An upsizing young family outbid four other registered groups to nab this tightly held home owned by the same family for several generations. The auction for the 910-square-metre block in a bush setting opened with an offer of $950,000. Bidding went up in $10,000 jumps before dropping to smaller increments. It sold for the reserve price through Luke Jeffree of Century 21 Jeffree Real Estate, who showed about 70 groups through the property.

13 Douglas Street, Stanmore NSW 2048.Photo: Supplied

SOLD $1,705,000 Stanmore 13 Douglas Street 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car spaces

It was a two-man race for this freestanding home which records show last sold for $1,111,000 just over four years ago. Bidding started at the $1.6 million price guide and went up in $20,000 and $10,000 bids, quickly passing the $1.65 million reserve. The property was snapped up by an investor, who bought the home for their young child to live in when they grow up. It sold through Michael Field of Belle Property Annandale. The vendors plan to upsize to another home in the inner west.

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Horn’s camp wants random drug testing as part of Pacquiao rematch

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Horn’s camp wants random drug testing as part of Pacquiao rematch, 苏州夜生活, by .

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The camp of WBO welterweight champion Jeff Horn will put random drug testing on the table as they continue negotiations for a rematch with Manny Pacquiao, with the second instalment increasingly likely to be held in in November.

After weeks of contemplation following his shock loss to the Queenslander at Suncorp Stadium in early July, the eight-division world champion looks certain to take up the option of a rematch, Top Rank’s Bob Arum telling Fairfax Media on Thursday that it was now just dates and venues holding up any announcement.

Horn returns to his Brisbane gym on Monday to begin training after a break following his victory over the Filipino great, who many thought would retire after losing a bloody and controversial unanimous decision through a dozen brutal rounds.

Horn’s trainer, Glenn Rushton, wasn’t entirely comfortable with the doping protocols for the first bout, which consisted of a standard post-bout urine sample. Neither fighter has ever returned a positive test.

But Rushton said they want to leave nothing to chance in the return, saying he would press the option of random pre-fight testing with promoters Duco Events before any deal was finalised. Drug testing has been an issue for Pacquiao in the past, most notably before his super fight with Floyd Mayweather. Even as recently as last month Mayweather was cagey when discussing Pacquiao and the notion of performance-enhancing drugs.

Rushton said they felt they would beat Pacquiao even more convincingly the second time, but he wants to ensure a level playing field for both men when they return to the ring for the sequel.

“It is something I’d bring up because what I don’t want is for them to go ‘The only way I can win this fight is if we are trying to get an unfair advantage’,” Rushton said. “I would certainly be very mindful of that. We want the big fights, but we want a level playing field.

“I’m very happy with any drug testing. I signed Jeff up for the WBC-VADA clean boxing program, which means you can be tested at any time. As an Olympian, we’re used to this sort of drug testing. We’ve had to do this many times. He’s clean as a whistle.

After hopes initially faded, with Horn calling out fighters such as Errol Spence on social media, the momentum for the rematch has grown in recent days. Arum has been speaking candidly and believes it will happen, with the fight likely to be Pacquiao’s final appearance in the ring as he juggles sport and his life as a Philippines senator.

Sydney and Melbourne are both in the running, even though the Queensland government has first and final rights of refusal. There had been reports of it taking place at Suncorp Stadium again, with giant air conditioners wheeled in to combat the heat, but Arum looks to have already ruled out any such move.

“We need to figure out where the fight will be,” Arum told ESPN. “The problem is we can’t have it outdoors again because of the weather [in Brisbane]. November is the summer there and it’s brutal to do it outdoors. We can’t do it. Even in July, which is their winter, it was pretty hot outdoors.”

Etihad Stadium remains a possibility, while Arum has been sweet-talked into a possible bout in Sydney by actor Nicole Kidman.

Rushton said he and Horn, who stands to make $2 million from the rematch, would be ready and waiting. “If we thought it was a fluke, we would be dodging it. But we’re saying let’s do it again, next time we’ll make it more convincing.

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The Aboriginal choir that took Germany by storm

12.12.2018, Comments Off on The Aboriginal choir that took Germany by storm, 苏州夜生活, by .

It’s not every day you see a group of 30-odd Aboriginal women in colourful dress on the streets of Melbourne. But then it’s not every day 30-odd Aboriginal women get to attend the world premiere of a movie in which they star.
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The Song Keepers is a remarkable and enormously enjoyable documentary about a rather improbable concert tour. In 2015, the Central n Aboriginal Women’s Choir went to Germany, to sing the hymns that had been brought to this country in the 19th century by Lutheran missionaries. And they sang them in their own languages, Pitjantjatjara and Arrarnta, to a rapturous response.

“It’s simultaneously contradictory,” says director Naina Sen of her debut feature, which turns all the easy assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and occupying cultures on their head. “You do have all the colonial stuff, but you also have this preservation of language, and sacred music, and a culture that already has sacred songs taking on another culture’s sacred songs.”

This choir is a relic, the last of a once-thriving scene. Lutheran missionaries translated 53 German hymns within three years of arriving in the outback in 1877, and those hymns were sung – religiously, you might say – by a plethora of choirs right up to the 1970s. But when the men drifted into country music, the choirs first became women-only and then began to dwindle.

By 2006, when choirmaster Morris Stuart arrived on the scene, the remnants of just a few were all that remained. A black man from British Guyana, he arrived hoping to introduce them to African freedom songs. Instead, they introduced him to their hymns.

“We’re taking them back to Germany, like a boomerang,” Morris says in the film of the 2015 trip. “But this time, encased in these Aboriginal languages.”

The singing in the film is joyous, the women frequently hilarious, but there are serious moments of reflection, too, that challenge the idea that Christian missions did more harm than good.

Theresa Nipper recalls being taken in by the wife of her mission’s pastor after she was rejected by the elders of her tribe for being the daughter of a white man. “People don’t understand,” she says. “They just think the missionaries came and took over, brought their God with them, the Bible and all that. But they don’t see the other side of the missionaries. They saved a lot of children’s lives.”

Daphne Puntjina talks of giving birth to a son after her husband was killed, and how the old women wanted to take the child and kill it, as was customary. But a government worker and his wife took her and the child in, cared for them, kept them safe.

“I’ve thought about this a lot in my life,” she says. “I still strongly value and practise my culture. I understand that was one law in the old days. We don’t practise this culture any more.”

But it is Pantjiti McKenzie who best summarises the duality that survives and thrives in these women and their choir. “My culture and my faith: I believe in both ways and it makes me stronger,” she says. “On Saturdays I take the young girls out bush. I teach them traditional dance and singing. And then later, the choir gets together to sing hymns in the church. I don’t feel like I have to choose between them. They’re both equally important to me. We stand by both.”

It’s powerful stuff that perhaps points a way forward even as it seeks to keep the past alive. And it’s every bit as uplifting and inspiring as any hymn, whether you’re a believer or not.

“This is a story about a group of exceptional women,” says Sen. “It’s about strength and hope and survival – of people, of culture, of language. And at the end of the day it’s a joyous celebration of these women taking culture back to its source – but on their own terms.”

The Song Keepers is at the Melbourne International Film Festival on Sunday at 3.30pm and on August 8 and 14. Details: miff苏州夜总会招聘.au The choir also performs at the Melbourne Recital Centre on Monday at 7.30pm. melbournerecital苏州夜总会招聘.au

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Peter Doohan farewelled at moving funeral at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Newcastle

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Peter Doohan farewelled at moving funeral at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Newcastle, 苏州夜生活, by .

UPDATED: Tennis legend Peter Doohan farewelled | PHOTOS Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebook Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers HOW DOOHAN BECAME THE ‘BECKER WRECKER’

TRIBUTES FLOW FOR DOOHAN

IN his final weeks, as the insidious disease took hold of his body, Hunter tennis legend Peter Doohan clung to life so he could see his sons one last time.

So fittingly, at acelebration of Doohan’s life on Saturday, it was John and Hunter who toldthose packed into Sacred Heart Cathedral about a man who was much more than just the“Becker Wrecker”.

Doohan became an iconic underdog figure and a sporting legend in the Hunter when hefamously defeatedtwo-time defending champion Boris Becker at Wimbledon in 1987.

His decades of coaching made him a mentor to thousands of kids.

But off the court, he touched the hearts of those who met him.

John said his father was“awonderful, inspiring and hilarious man”.

Hunter spoke about his dad’s passion forthe Newcastle Knights, his love of INXS and his appreciation for“corny dad jokes”.

Doohan spent 20 years playing and coaching in the US, but returned toNelson Bay in 2009.

He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of Motor Neurone Diseasein May and given only months to live.

John and Hunter, as well as Doohan’s good matesPat Serretand Simon Robinson, his teammates at the University of Arkansas where Doohan was a NCAA champion, traveled to the Hunter in June to see him one last time.

“I truly believe that dad hung on with his life as hard as he could because he was looking forward to that trip so much,” John said.

“Pat and Simon left after a few days and Hunter and I spent two weeks with dad and had some incredible laughs and memories that we will both cherish forever.”

Father Brian Mascord, who told those gathered that Doohan had“whooped” him on the tennis court on more than one occasion, said the Hunter tennis great would be buried in a pair of“budgie smugglers”, a Knights singlet and a Knights blanket.

“That is loyalty,” Father Mascord said.

“And after Peter died the Knights won their first game in ages.

“When Peter comes to be canonised, that’s his first miracle.

“It has to be a miracle.”

With an n flag draped over his coffin, Doohan was carried from the cathedral and through a guard of honour, formed by some of his young tennis students, tennis racquets raised towards the sky.

EARLIER STORY:

HUNDREDS have turned out to farewell Hunter tennis legend Peter Doohan, who died last month after a brief battle with motor neurone disease.

Dubbed the“Becker Wrecker” after famously defeating two-time defending champion Boris Becker at Wimbledon in 1987, Doohan reached a career-high world ranking of 43.

He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of MND in May and given only months to live.

Doohan, who was living at Nelson Bay,died on July 21, aged 56.

Newcastle West’sSacred Heart Cathedral was packed with family, friends and fellow tennis players for a moving service on Saturday.

Doohan’ssons, John and Hunter, spoke of their father’s sense of humour, his love of the Newcastle Knights and his outstanding tennis career.

Father Brian Mascord, who told those gathered that Doohan had“whooped” him on the tennis court on more than one occasion, said the n tennis great would be buried in a pair of“budgie smugglers”, a Knights singlet and a Knights blanket.

“That is loyalty,” Father Mascord said.

“And after Peter died the Knights won their first game in ages.

“When Peter comes to be canonised, that’s his first miracle.

“It has to be a miracle.”

With an n flag draped over his coffin, Doohan was carried from the cathedral and through a guard of honour, formed by some of hisyoung tennis students with racquets in hand, outside.

Born in Newcastle,Doohan spent his formative years atMerewether High School, playing tennis at District Park in Broadmeadow on weekends under the guidance of coach Frank Brent.

After turning professional, he spent 20 years playing and coaching in the United States.

He was based inArkansas, where he went to university, was an All-Americanand twice wontheNCAAdoubles title.

Doohan returned to Nelson Bay in 2009 and coached up until June last year.

His victory over Becker in the second-round at Wimbledon in 1987 made him a household name in , but he was far from a one-match wonder.

He was unbeaten in the Davis Cup, won the South n Open singles title and reached No. 15 in the world indoubles, winning five titles during his distinguished career.

He was also the runner-up in the men’s doubles at the n Open in 1987, he and partnerLaurie Warder going down to SwedesAnders Järryd andStefan Edberg.

In lieu of flowers, Doohan’s family asked thata donation in Peter’s memorybe made at theService to Motor Neurone Disease Association of NSW.

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Newcastle rugby: Roos draw strength from miracle comeback against Hawks

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Newcastle rugby: Roos draw strength from miracle comeback against Hawks, 苏州夜生活, by .

DRAWING POWER: Caileb Gerrard steps through a tackle of Connor Mulhearn on the way to scoring a match-levelling try against Hamilton. Pictures: Stewart Hazell
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SOMEHOW Lake Macquarie found a way.

Down 37-16 to premiers and unbeaten leaders Hamilton with 18minutes remaining, the game –the Roos’season –appeared done and dusted.

The Hawks, seemingly, thought that too.

Roos’ revival draws praise TweetFacebook NHRU round 15Photos: Stewart Hazell, Michael HartshornThen Lake Macquarie lock Junior Osasa crashed over to cut the margin to 37-23 in the 72nd minute.

Two minutes later, Ken Villiamu crossed toclose within a converted try. Surely not.

With time up, fly-half Brendan Holliday went right only to find a dead end. He did a u-turn, glanced left and floated a “Hail Mary” pass. Centre Caileb Gerrard had to hurryto make the catch and all-off-a-sudden was in a hole. He burstthrough an attempted tackle by debut Connor Mulhearn and raced 20 metres to touch down.Holliday added the simple conversion to complete the great escape.

“I didn’t think we were a chance after being down by 20-odd,” Holliday admitted. “We did really well to fight back. I sawCaileb on the left and tossed it. It didn’t come out of the hand very well and floated too much. In the chaos, he was able to cut through. We were lucky really, but you can’t question the boys heart.”

The Roos, despite the grandstand finish, slipped out of the top five on percentages after Merewether thrashed University 52-34 at Townson Oval.Theymeetin a showdown for fifth place at Walters Park next Saturday.

After the Greens, the Roos have away games to Maitland and Nelson Bay.

Merewether tackleSouthern Beaches (home) and Hamilton (away).

The Waratahs, who trounced Singleton 52-22, are three points behind Merewether and Lake Macquarie and are the only other side with a realistic chance of moving into the five.They face Wanderers (a), Nelson Bay (h) and University (a).

If the Roos are to play in the finals for the first time since 2012, Holliday conceded thatthey must cut out the errors.

“When we string phases together we can match anyone,” Holliday said. “It is just the silly off-loads and the penalty count. We got killed in the penalties. That is obviously partly our fault.Once you get the roll against you in the penalties, they seem to keep coming.”

At half-time, Hamilton were in front 18-16 on the scoreboard and7-5 in the penalty. Twenty minutes into the second half the penalty count had ballooned to 17-6. Most of the penalties awarded by referee Brendon Farrar wereat the breakdown.

“It looked like it was a set of laws for them and one for us,”Lake Macquarie coach Tim Chidgey fumed.

Hamilton coach Scott Coleman was equally frustrated.

“Where is the consistency,” Coleman said. “A couple of weeks ago we had four penalties against us in a row and received two yellow cards. Today the penalty count at one stage was 17-6 and 10-1 in the second half and there was one yellow card.I will ask for clarification during the week.”

Coleman also had praise for Lake Macquarie.

“Full credit to them, they showed a lot of heart,” he said. “In the first half, wehad nine turnovers and seven were from knock-ons. They were mistakes but theopposition force that on you too. Hopefully we learned a lesson that we can’t switch off.”

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Poultry code review could help unscramble chicken-cruelty rules

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Poultry code review could help unscramble chicken-cruelty rules, 苏州夜生活, by .

Impact of egg production on hens
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is lagging well behind international standards when it comes to the use of battery cages. But in 2017, there is an opportunity for progress.

More than 25 million hens, plus millions of male chicks, are used by the n egg industry every year.

Egg production is divided across three primary farming methods – battery cages, barn-laid and free range. This separation in farming styles has led to eggs becoming one of the most confusing, and hotly debated, animal products on the market.

Eggs attract fierce debate as consumers are vocal about their expectations of how eggs should be produced, and how hens should be treated.

Which is why it is so shocking that, in 2017, approximately 11 to 12 million hens are still confined in battery cage systems across .

Battery cages have already been banned, or are being phased out, in a significant number of global markets due to the severe welfare issues inherent in their use, including Canada, New Zealand, Switzerland and Austria.

In , the ACT is the only jurisdiction to have prohibited the use of battery cages.

Arguably factory farming at its worst, the battery cage production system permanently confines egg-laying hens in rows of tiny cages in a shed for their entire lives, locked in a cage with less space than that of an A4 page for each bird.

Independent animal welfare science (and common sense) shows how much hens suffer within these cages.

There are numerous issues, including severe mental and behavioural impacts, and physical issues. The extreme lack of space and inactivity, in combination with the physical effort of producing eggshells for unnaturally high egg production, can result in hens developing osteoporosis, leading to chronic pain from bone fractures. This is a systemic problem across the cage-egg industry, with a 2004 study estimating that 80-89 per cent of commercial egg-laying hens suffer from osteoporosis.

In fact, a hen’s bones could become so weak that her spine disintegrates and she becomes paralysed. She will then die from dehydration in her cage.

What’s more, forced to stand on wire flooring, hens can also suffer chronic pain from foot lesions, and serious bone and muscle weakness. The wire cage flooring can result in a hen’s feet becoming sore, cracked and deformed and, in some cases, her nails twisting around the wire mesh flooring to restrict her movements even further or even to trap her to the floor.These are serious issues for hens, and yet, when conversations happen about eggs production, the welfare of the laying hen is often ignored.

Voiceless has launched its latest in-depth report, Unscrambled: The Hidden Truth of Hen Welfare in the n Egg Industry, in an effort to bring much-needed attention to the welfare and labelling issues of the industry.

The product of two years of extensive research and legal review, Unscrambled assesses the key animal protection issues associated with the use of battery cages, but also barn-laid and free-range systems, from an animal welfare and scientific perspective.

The report, which has been reviewed by seven leading animal welfare and legal experts, and endorsed by major animal protection organisations Animals , Mercy for Animals (US) and Compassion in World Farming (UK), explores the current status of hen and chick welfare in , and how we compare globally.

The short answer? It is not a pretty picture.

Battery cages, barn-laid and free-range systems all present major animal welfare issues, some that are unavoidable in the production of eggs, such as the maceration (grinding up) of day-old male chicks.

Consumer groups too, are frustrated at the loose use of the term “free range”, duping consumers into buying eggs that fall well below their expectations.

Yet there are emerging opportunities for significant advancements in animal welfare in the egg industry.

For instance, for the first time in 15 years, the Model Code of Practice for Poultry is under review in 2017. The code sets the standards for how chickens can be treated, and currently condones permanent confinement of hens, which is illegal to inflict upon a dog or cat.

Voiceless has serious concerns that this opportunity for change will instead be used as a means to lock in the continued use of cages in permanently, due to concerns raised about the independence of the review process.

Therefore, to address the serious welfare issues within the n egg industry, a multi-tiered approach is required from industry, government, businesses and consumers.

This approach must address the suffering of the millions of hens who are living within ‘s egg production industry, but also to prepare for future generations of hens and their offspring.

To address the immediate suffering of hens, industry and government must at least take steps towards a phase-out of standard industry mutilation practices such as beak trimming and the maceration of male chicks.

However, to advance the protection of chickens, it is the role of business and consumers to lead the call for meaningful change, to demand that the millions of chickens who live in are treated in a way that meets our expectations, and are at least free from battery cages.

The Model Code of Practice for Poultry is under review and is due to open up for public consultation in August.

Unscrambled: The hidden truth of hen welfare in the n egg industry is available for free download.

Elise Burgess for Voiceless, the animal protection institute.

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NPL: Edgeworth close on minor premiership as Maitland turn tide on Jaffas

12.12.2018, Comments Off on NPL: Edgeworth close on minor premiership as Maitland turn tide on Jaffas, 苏州夜生活, by .

Edgeworth goalscorers Brody Taylor and Daniel McBreenValentine coach Darren Sills believes Edgeworth will power to their third consecutive Northern NSW NPL premiership double after they made his side “look second-rate” in a 5-0 drubbing on Saturday.
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Fifth-placed Phoenix were desperate for a win in the penultimate-round game at Cahill Oval to keep their finals hopes afloatbut they paid the price for errors in the first half to trail the ladder leaders 2-0 at the break.

Brody Taylor put the Eagles ahead in the 32ndminute with a header off a Dom Bizzarri cross, whichwas put over goalkeeper Scott Carter who had rushed out of his area.

Dylan Holz then hit a shot from an acute angle which came off Carter’s hands into goals as he dived back towards the goalline.

Will Bower made it 3-0 in the 84thminute after Carter spilled a cross, Daniel McBreen hit a powerful strike on the run from range in the 90thand Keigo Moriyasu cleverly chipped the keeper in the 94th.

The win and third-placed Lambton Jaffas’ 2-1 loss to Maitland at Edden Oval on Saturday means only Hamilton Olympic can now stop Edgeworth from claiming the minor premiership. Olympic are two points behind the Eagles. Hamilton play Broadmeadow in the last round, while Edgeworth host Lakes.

Regardless of what Hamilton can do, Sills believed the Eagles were on track for another title double. Valentine are out of the finals race after Broadmeadow won on Sunday.

“There were a couple of mistakes in the first half that meant we had to change game plan and that didn’t help,” Sills said.“But, in the end, we were totally outclassed and on that performance I can’t see anyone beating them. They made us look second-rate today.”

To make matters worse, Valentine’s league-leading goalscorer and player of the year contender, Jalon Brown, went down late with a hamstring tear and looks unlikely to feature again this year.

Edgeworth coach Damian Zane could just about touch the premiership trophy.

“It sort of half feels like we’ve won it, but we haven’t,” Zane said. “But gee, it would be hard to see us losing it from here.”

The result meansEdgeworth are now eight goals better than Hamilton, meaning a draw next week should be enough to guarantee the premiership.

At Edden Oval, the Jaffas went ahead in the second minute when the ball fell in the box to an unmarked Ryan Griffiths, whoburied his left-foot shot.

Lambton were in control for the rest of the half without extending their lead, but Maitland took over in the second half and led in the 59th minute afterLiam Thornton’s header from a corner and Jye Mackellar’s finish from a rebounded.

The win kept Maitland’s finals hopes alive on Saturday alive but Broadmeadow ended them on Sunday.

Maitland coach Phil Dando said his side rolled their sleeves up andgot the job done.

“The strong wind made a difference and we ran with it second half,” Dando said.

“But we were really sloppy two minutes in to concede and we just weren’t desperate enough.

“But as the half went on I thought we coped with the bumpy pitch and defended well, even though they had some good chances.

“We had to take Matt Sokulsky off in the first half and we changed from 4-4-3 to 4-4-2 and it worked quite well.

“We defended well and created some chances in the second half.

“Then we hung on and didn’t concede a late goal as we’ve been prone to do. We grafted hard which we don’t always do as well as we might.”

Dando was full of praise for Trott, whomade acrucial save late, and centre-backs Shane Cansdell-Sherriff and Zac Hill.

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This map shows the spread of Melbourne’s $1 million suburbs

12.12.2018, Comments Off on This map shows the spread of Melbourne’s $1 million suburbs, 苏州夜生活, by .

Ten years ago, there were only five Melbourne suburbs that had a median house price of $1 million. Now there are 121, which have enveloped most of the inner city, Domain Group data shows.
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This map shows how much of Melbourne is now taken up by suburbs with this hefty asking price.

As of June this year, more than 100 suburbs formed a solid bloc that expands out from the inner city, stretching as far north as Rosanna and as far south as Beaumaris.

Abbotsford, Burnley, Brunswick, Clayton, Collingwood, Highett and Glen Huntly are among the areas that have turned red in the past year.

But if you watch how the ranks of the million-dollar club have grown over time, many of the recently-minted members have been eastern suburbs.

The furthest east the band of million-dollar suburbs reached in 2014 was Mont Albert, about 15 kilometres from the CBD. Glen Waverley and Mount Waverley join the following year. In 2016, the median house price is Box Hill, Blackburn and Chadstone reached $1 million.

The only spots of blue left in the inner city are the CBD, Docklands and Southbank. That’s largely a reflection of the fact the data used to create the map was house prices, and residential stock in these areas is mostly apartment blocks.

There are also two small blue shapes just south of the city if you squint closely at the map. These are Ripponlea and Gardenvale, but because these suburbs are so small, there have not been enough house sales in them this year to produce an accurate median. Both areas have recorded medians of above $1 million in the past, though.

This map shows the suburbs with a current median house price of $1 million in red. Click or hover over a suburb to see its name and current median.

But there is one thing to keep in mind when you look at this map. It does not account for inflation, so $1 million is not as large a sum as it was 10 years ago.

Outside of the main bloc of suburbs, there are some pricey isolated pockets such as Williamstown to the west, Plenty to the north and Waterways to the south.

There is also a cluster of 6-million-dollar suburbs in the Essendon area with million-dollar medians.

Barry Plant Essendon’s Tony Catena said the area’s strongly-performing state schools, decent public transport options and short distance to the city were a big drawcard for buyers.

“It’s quicker to get to the city from Essendon than from the other side of town,” he said.

He tipped Yarraville as the next suburb in the inner-west to see its median house prices rise above the million mark.

The graphic also shows how the number of suburbs in the club has fluctuated. The club contracted following the global financial crisis and again in 2012. But since then its numbers have swelled each consecutive year.

Hawthorn East has had the most turbulent time. It joined in 2008 with a median of $1.1 million, but was kicked out the following year when average house prices dipped to $950k.

It clawed its way back in 2010, fell away again in 2012, but has remained within the club since 2013.

The suburb now has a median house price of $1.8 million and may well be considering its chances of entering the even more elite $2 million club.

That’s right, the $2 million club: a more exclusive clan has emerged.

This $2 million club takes in a dozen suburbs: Armadale, Balwyn, Brighton, Camberwell, Canterbury, Deepdene, Kew, Kooyong, Malvern, Middle Park, St Kilda West and Toorak.

Toorak was the founding member of this clan – its median house price was $2.3 million as far back as 2007.

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Pray and act: Church and state collide over euthanasia laws

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Pray and act: Church and state collide over euthanasia laws, 苏州夜生活, by .

Margaret Tighe from Right to Life at her home in Essendon. Photo: Scott McNaughton .
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Right to Life is not known for its subtlety in a fight.

So when ads started appearing in Daniel Andrews’ local suburban newspaper recently – accusing the Premier of trying to legalise “patient killing” – few were surprised that the pro-life group was involved.

At its head is seasoned campaigner Margaret Tighe, now in her 80s, and a veteran of decades of “punishment politics”. From the battle to decriminalise abortion, to the IVF debate, her organisation has routinely targeted MPs in volatile seats with highly emotive scare campaigns.

The assisted dying bill in Victoria – endorsed by Andrews himself – has brought Tighe out again to wage moral war.

“We’re taking the fight right up to the enemy,” she told Fairfax Media this week as her group distributed leaflets across eight marginal seats – as well as Andrews’ Mulgrave electorate. “It’s a controversial issue, so it’s important that people know what’s being proposed.”

With state parliament set to decide whether terminally ill people should have the right to a physician-assisted death, Right to Life is part of a formidable coalition of opponents: from religious leaders and medical specialists, to disability groups and hardline campaigners, all fighting the legislation.

Politicians are being bombarded with pro forma emails and letters – some scripted by church volunteers, others by national anti-euthanasia agencies – urging them to vote against the bill when it is introduced at Spring Street later this month.

Delegations of faith-based representatives and doctors are criss-crossing the state to meet MPs: a few weeks ago, for instance, n Christian Lobby state president Dan Flynn brought in three doctors to see upper house leader Gavin Jennings, the Premier’s right-hand-man in cabinet, to argue the need for better palliative care.

“The best arguments are not necessarily religious,” says Flynn.

And Right to Life recently paid for US anti-euthanasia campaigner William Toffler, a controversial Catholic doctor who believes abortion can lead to breast cancer, to conduct a speaking tour around .

But the biggest combatant of all is the Catholic Church. On Thursday, as Melbourne shivered through another frosty winter morning, Pat Shea, a parish volunteer from Inverloch, entered the electorate office of Bass MP Brian Paynter, holding a petition and letters from churchgoers with a simple message: don’t vote for the bill.

The seeds of that message were on sown on April 18, when Archbishop Denis Hart wrote to priests asking them to “pray and to act”, in other words, to get mobilised and to find “lay people” to spread the church’s concerns about the renewed push for reform.

Attached to his letter was a two-page document co-signed by his bishops, arguing voluntary euthanasia was “never justified” and merely represented “the abandonment of the sick and the suffering”. The Catholic Education Office passed that document on to its Victorian schools. Some are now getting politically active.

“The case for legalised ‘Physician Assisted Suicide’ is a direct attack upon our Catholic beliefs and would further erode society’s respect for the 5th commandment,” said one recent newsletter to parents at St Joseph’s School in Wonthaggi.

“Euphemisms, such as ‘assisted dying’ and ‘dying with dignity’ are being hailed as acts of compassion, yet, with the sugar coating removed, euthanasia is about actively killing someone, and assisted suicide is helping someone to suicide. We need your help to convince our local member of parliament to oppose ‘Physician Assisted Suicide’ and to promote Palliative Care. An information session is planned.”

Opinion polls show the church is fighting an uphill battle, with up to 85 per cent of the community in favour giving of terminally ill people the right to a physician-assisted death.

If the legislation succeeds, it will be the first time such a law has passed in since euthanasia was legalised in the Northern Territory in 1995, only to be overturned by the federal parliament one year after taking effect.

The difference for Victoria is that the Commonwealth has no power to repeal the state euthanasia legislation. And in a sign of just how tight the numbers are likely to be, government insiders have not ruled out introducing the bill in the upper house, where some are more confident of securing a majority when the legislation is put to a conscience vote.

This unusual tactic would give more time to undecided MPs in the lower house, where Andrews and Health Minister Jill Hennessy will champion the bill, but Deputy Premier James Merlino, Opposition leader Matthew Guy, and a considerable number of Liberal, National and Labor politicians are set to vote against it.

Most, however, are hopeful the debate won’t be quite as vicious as the battle to decriminalise abortion in Victoria in 2008. Back then, animal organs were sent to cabinet minister Jacinta Allan; plastic fetuses were distributed to pro-choice politicians accusing them of being murderers; some MPs were even sent abusive emails directly to their Blackberries from angry members of the public as they sat down from speaking during the vote.

“I think inside the chamber it will be a pretty respectful debate, but outside the chamber – who knows?” says Greens MP Colleen Hartland.

Hartland recalls the abortion debate well, partly because it happened the same year she introduced her own private members’ bill for voluntary euthanasia, which was resoundingly defeated. But a lot has changed since then: the influence of religion; the views of MPs; the public’s momentum.

The “Yes” side of the campaign is spearheaded by neurosurgeon Brian Owler, who headed the government’s expert panel for the bill, Dying With Dignity’s Dr Rodney Syme, and newcomers like Go Gentle, the not-for-profit body set up last year by TV personality-turned-euthanasia advocate Andrew Denton.

Denton has devoted the past few years to reforming the law, but was forced to withdraw this week to have multiple bypass surgery after being diagnosed with advanced heart disease.

Until he can return, Go Gentle’s work will continue under its campaign manager Paul Price, a former senior adviser in the Baillieu Liberal government. In a bid to mobilise the “silent majority”, a new ad will soon be released in marginal seats asking people whether the individual, or the church, should have the right to choose how long they suffer in intolerable pain before death.

The aim, says Price, is to overcome the “noisy minority of mostly faith-based opponents”.

“They are organised and active,” he says.

Indeed, Right to Life stepped up its campaign in May, when Tighe sent a letter to every parliamentarian with a table of the nine MPs in marginal seats that her group targeted over abortion a decade ago – plus the swings against them at the 2010 Victorian election. It was hardly a subtle threat.

Others, like the ACL’s Dan Flynn or Paul Russell, from the national anti-euthanasia group, HOPE, have mobilised their supporters to take part in a grassroots letter-writing campaign, while representatives travel from electorate-to-electorate in the hope of swaying MPs.

The state’s Christian leaders have also made it clear that the battlelines have been drawn: note, for example, this week’s “open letter” in the Herald Sun, signed by leaders in the Greek Orthodox, Lutheran, Anglican, Catholic, the Syro-Malabar Eparchy, Ukrainian Catholic, and Coptic Orthodox Churches.

Andrews, the Catholic premier whose resistance to voluntary euthanasia shifted last year after the death of his father, responds like this: “People are free to express their views,” he says.

“I would hope, though, that this debate is conducted in the spirit of respect. My own conscience tells me that this is the change that needs to be made.”

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Newcastle netball: BNC Whanau look to finals with confidence

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Newcastle netball: BNC Whanau look to finals with confidence, 苏州夜生活, by .

SUCCESS: Victoria Aoake and BNC Whanau qualified for the semi-finals.BNC Whanau coach CherieAoake-Puru believed her side were in a good position heading into a semi-final rematch with Forsythes after an impressive final-round win over Nova Thunder.
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BNC Whanau secured fourth placein the Newcastle open netball championship and a semi-final showdown with third-placed Forsythes next week with a 43-29 victory on Saturday at National Park.

Maryville Tavern Alize, who were a chance of leapfrogging BNC Whanau heading into the last round,lost 60-34 to second-placedSouths Lions on Saturday to finish fifth.

Elsewhere on Saturday, minor premiers West Leagues Balance defeated Junction Stella 66-19 andForsythes beat Souths Pride 32-29.

“We needed that,” Aoake-Puru said.

“We haven’t been in good form the last few weeks and we needed to put a good four quarters together, which is what the girls did. It’s good heading into finals for us.”

“We led from the first quarter, which was something we were discussing and working on all week at training, and before the game.

“It was the game plan to not come from behind like we have been.”

She said the return of premier league player Victoria Aoake, who played centre for the first three-quarters andgoal defence in the last, boosted the squad.

“Caity Lobston, Mikaela Dombkins and Lucy Geise, theyall shot into the 90 per cents, which always helps, but I think the key wasMonique Walkington,Kaitlin Harcus andDominique Murphy, that defensive end, they were really solid and shut down their shooters,” she added.

“I’ve never seen so many balls go out the back of thecourt.

“Hopefully if we can put on the same performance next week, it will be enough to get us over the line.”

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