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The age of non-violence in sport: we are going about it all wrong

12.12.2018, Comments Off on The age of non-violence in sport: we are going about it all wrong, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

As a sense of destiny begins to collect around the Parramatta Eels as the “it” team of the NRL, next season if not this, I watched highlights of their 1981-to-1983 premierships. Partly this was a nostalgic exercise in confirming that Brett Kenny was the most fluid, naturally gifted player to have graced the game, and that Eric Grothe was its greatest winger. (Answer to both: emphatically yes.)
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The eye-opening discovery was incidental but more topical. What an unrelentingly violent game rugby league used to be. Most of it went unremarked; therefore, what a violent world it was we lived in.

What stands out in that old footage is that nearly every tackle contained a punch, thrown mostly but not always by the tackler. Eye-gouges, head-high shots, squirrel grips and plain straight rights: the game resembled a poetry festival – an organised street brawl punctuated by moments of artistic genius. All at a time when they said league had gone soft compared with previous days.

How we perceive and talk about violence has undergone a profound shift, perhaps the most significant change between those times and these. This week, violent play and its perception has been a headline issue in three codes. In league, Canberra’s Sia Soliola was suspended for five weeks for a late tackle that connected accidentally with Billy Slater’s head. In union, All Black Sonny Bill Williams will remain suspended until the Bledisloe Cup for an accidental contact with a British Lions player more than a month ago. And in the AFL, Geelong’s Patrick Dangerfield has lost his chance to win the Brownlow Medal because of a rough tackle that accidentally caused Carlton’s Matthew Kreuzer’s head to hit the ground. Each punishment was excessive, demonstrating how confused the codes have become on the issue of violent play. In their justified campaigns against concussion, it’s as if the codes have collectively suffered a bad head knock. They’re not thinking straight.

In football, there is violence and there is violence. Rugby league’s era of ultra-violence was brought to an end by an escalation of sickening incidents. In 1982, Wests’ Bob Cooper ran 40 metres to join a punch-up and clocked three Illawarra Steelers. Society was changing: it was less inclined to forgive male violence. On suspending Cooper for 15 months, judiciary chairman Jim Comans said, “Acts such as these must be obliterated from the game, and I’ll begin by obliterating you.” Comans set about changing the game. In 1983, the Blues’ Les Boyd launched his elbow at Queensland’s Darryl Brohman’s jaw in an Origin match, and received a 12-month ban. In 1987, St George’s Steve Linnane was rubbed out for 20 weeks for blatantly eye-gouging Greg “Brandy” Alexander. (Future league television personalities received their critical reviews well in advance.) And in the early 2000s, Manly’s John Hopoate’s excesses, including his infamous “date rape” encounters with three Cowboys, signalled the death throes of the age of violence and the beginnings of one man’s career in private security.

The nature of on-field violence has since changed profoundly, as has the thinking on it. The codes seek to identify and punish it more and more, but understand it less and less.

Violent intent has diminished in football, to be replaced by the violence of physics: the bodies are bigger and move faster, the collisions are harder, but the skull has not evolved to grow harder or the brain more resistant. So the danger in playing these games has increased even while intentional violence has almost disappeared. Our knowledge of the long-term effects of concussion has advanced markedly, and the codes now market themselves to parents considering whether to let their children play. All of these factors are new. But the language of addressing ‘violent’ or ‘rough’ play remains stuck in the pre-1980s terms of deterrence and punishment.

Here’s the question. Which is worse, a fist on the end of the arm of an 80-kilogram player, thrown intentionally at the head? Or the shoulder of a 110-kilogram player, launched at the chest but accidentally hitting the head? If we are considering intention, obviously the former is worse. But they might have the same effect: a concussion. So the codes react to a legal act, which had unintended consequences, as if it is violent thuggery. Accidents are punished and publicised as if they are as horrendous as a Cooper/Linnane/Boyd/Hopoate assault.

When they should be thinking about deterrence, image-conscious codes have become obsessed with effect. Soliola should have been sent off for an act where he carelessly targeted an opposition playmaker. As Slater missed the rest of that match, so should Soliola. That would be a useful protection for playmakers. But a five-week suspension? Soliola only aimed to tackle Slater in the way that effective tackles are taught: upwards into the ball-carrying area of the body, using the shoulder and arm. The plastic edge of Slater’s boot slipped on the turf, causing him to fall, and Soliola’s tackle concussed him. Similar happened with Williams, when the opponent’s slip turned a legitimate tackle into a shoulder charge. With Dangerfield, a solid tackle with a good technique became an offence when Kreuzer’s head hit the turf. In none of these incidents was the intent violent, in the 1980s sense of the word. Yet the punishments have been disproportionate, and have no deterrent effect.

After Dangerfield’s suspension, will AFL tackles be taught and executed differently? Not a bit. His only crime was Kreuzer’s misfortune. So there is no deterrence. Likewise with the Soliola and Williams suspensions. Neither will cause any change in the way footballers are taught to tackle, because 99 per cent of such tackles are legal, effective and rewarded. The one per cent where the tackled player has slipped will not change that.

If they are not deterring footballers (and how can you deter an accident?), the highly-publicised suspensions are doing something else. They are more in the marketing business. They are trying to con parents into thinking these games are safe and will cause no damage to their children’s brains. The message is not we will deter violence or make the game safer. The message is that if an accident happens, we will find someone to blame.

Consider this. If you try to run someone over in your car and miss, you still go to jail for attempted murder. But in football, if you try to knock someone’s head off with a coathanger tackle and miss, nothing happens to you. Not even a penalty. Whereas if you try to do the right thing – drive under 40 km/h as it were – and happen to hurt someone because they slipped while crossing the road, then you go to jail, because for every victim, the authorities need a villain.

Something is not right there. The huge football suspensions of the 1980s deterred players from violence and changed the game’s culture. The suspensions of today’s accidental violators will not decrease the violence inherent in these games; all they will do is prompt players to take up religion or just hope they’re not unlucky.

The heaviest suspensions should be reserved for acts of violent intent. Dangerfield, or any other Brownlow Medal aspirant, should not be ruled out of contention for good play that had an accidental side-effect. Months-long suspensions for accidents serve no purpose other than to advertise an incoherent and hypocritical message. These sports encourage, reward and pride themselves on raising ever larger, ever faster human projectiles who throw themselves into harder and harder collisions. And yet when the inevitable accident occurs in those collisions and something looks bad, a scapegoat must be found.

Heavy suspensions for accidents make no sense. You cannot accidentally sprint across the field to deck three people. You cannot accidentally break a person’s jaw after running at them with your elbow. You cannot gouge your fingers repeatedly into an opponent’s eye or anus by accident. Serious suspensions should be reserved for real violence. Anything else is just advertising.

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Which of these Sydney listings is your ideal home?

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Which of these Sydney listings is your ideal home?, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Whether you’re on the hunt for your next home, or simply appreciate beautiful architecture and interior design, Sydney’s real estate market has plenty of wish-list-worthy properties.
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In this week’s showcase, take your pick from four of Domain’s favourites, in Woollahra, Cronulla, Glebe and Palm Beach. Palm Beach

This three-level home has space in spades. Of its four bedrooms, two have water views and ensuites. There’s potential on the lower level to create another bedroom for guests, a private retreat, or maybe even a yoga studio.

You might find it hard to drag your eyes away from the view, which spans Pittwater, Careel Bay, and up to Ku-ring-gai National Park.

LJ Hooker Palm Beach agent Peter Robinson is selling the home, which he’s priced at $2,895,000. Related: Open homes to see this weekend in SydneyRelated: Award-winning Newtown pad a cut above the restRelated: Balancing head and heart when househuntingViews span all the way to Ku-ring-gai National Park. Photo: Supplied

See more photos at Domain hereWoollahra

This home is blessed by a killer location: it has level access to Woollahra village, the expansive greens of Centennial Park to the south, and some of Sydney’s most famous beaches to the east. 36 Holdsworth Street, Woollahra.Photo: Supplied

The property has been a labour of love for its current owner, who designed its stylish finishes and fittings himself.

Ben Collier of the Agency is asking $3 million for the property which will go to auction on August 12. The terrace has undeniable street presence. Photo: Supplied

See more photos at Domain hereGlebe

The residents at 64 Toxteth Road will leave behind a history of happy memories when they sell the property after four decades of ownership. 64 Toxteth Road, Glebe.Photo: Supplied

Belle Property Glebe’s Mark Tooth says the shingle-style cottage is filled with 19th-century charm.

As keen design buffs may recognise, it takes cues from the work of notable American architect John Horbury Hunt.

The vendor’s are hoping to snag a sale price of $3.6 million to $3.7 million. The home’s major design inspiration came from American architect John Horbury Hunt. Photo: Supplied

See more photos at Domain hereCronulla

This apartment may have been renovated extensively in recent years, but there’s no going past the outlook over Cronulla beach when choosing its star feature. 4/2 McDonald Street, Cronulla.Photo: Supplied

“It feels like you’re surrounded by water,” says agent Matthew Callaghan of Highland Property Agents Cronulla, who expects to sell for between $2,250,000 and $2,475,000 at the August 12 auction.

To have a morning coffee or breakfast with a view, residents can just hop downstairs to the aptly named Next Door cafe. The home has recently been renovated for contemporary comfort. Photo: Supplied

See more photos at Domain here

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Time to pull our heads out of the water bucket

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Time to pull our heads out of the water bucket, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

How old am I? I am so old, soooooo old, I remember when n swimmers only had to dip a toe in chlorinated water and they started growing gold medals on their chest! I remember when all it took for Kieren Perkins to beat American swimmers was to frown at them in the change-rooms, whereupon they’d burst into tears. And, yes, I can even remember when the World Swimming Championships were a big deal, with Ray Warren calling every race – “Hackett! Hackett! Hackett is world champion, I’ll tell a men he is!” – and they kept the n National Anthem on fast forward as they had to get through it so many times. They are, of course, days long gone, and after these latest World Championships in Budapest – where our mob secured just a single gold medal, n swimming has not been at such a low ebb since the 1976 Montreal Olympics when Stephen Holland managed to get a bronze medal only.
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It is part of swimming folklore that when, shortly afterwards, the then Prime Minister, Malcolm Fraser, got the exhausted and bitterly disappointed Queenslander on the phone to congratulate him for getting at least that, Holland uttered just two words. The first of them rhymed with “buck”, and the second one was “off” – so annoyed was he with the lack of government support for his endeavours, all while he was up against swimmers from the college system of America, and the professionally prepared, and drugged, swimmers of the Eastern Bloc. It was that outburst which was the genesis of the whole AIS system.

But this time? There appears nowhere to go. The swimming program is well-funded and our swimmers cannot complain of lack of support. The simple reality is that not only has the rest of the world caught up, some of them have lapped us. And the real problem, as n swimming tries to find its way back? We gotta face it: in itself, the sport is not the most compelling of spectacles. It’s been fabulous over the years watching the likes of Perkins, Hackett, Thorpe and O’Neill motor down competitors over the final lap – but watching their heirs come second, third and seventh just doesn’t quite do it for us. I wish I cared more. Maybe it’s that, having seen the mental anguish so many of our champion swimmers go through in later life – having spent “six hours a day every day, with my head in a bucket of water,” as Perkins put it to me – I’m less fussed if the sport does recede a little.

Catching hell

Interesting yarn. In the sixth game of the World Series back in 2003, the Chicago Cubs are leading the best-of-seven series 3-2 and in this game at their home Wrigley’s Field are ahead 3-0 at the bottom of the eighth innings. History is at their fingertips, when slugger Luis Castillo of the Florida Marlins hits a foul ball which soars towards the fence. The Cubs outfielder Mois??s Alou moves back … and back … and back and finally jumps high with his glove outstretched behind him. If he catches it, the Marlins will be just about hooked, cooked, and done for. Sitting in the front row at the time, Steve Bartman, a Cubs fan, watches stunned as the ball head his way. Is it going to hit him? He reacts instinctively. With no time to think, he puts his hand out just as ever did when his father threw him the ball in their backyard in the ‘burbs just above Alou’s outstretched glove, interfering with what would have been a catch and an out.

Long wait: Cubs fans celebrate the 2016 World Series win. Photo: AP

Castillo is still alive, and the Marlins are back in the game! The Marlins go on to score eight runs in that innings, win the match, and then the series. Bartman is suddenly starring in his own long-running horror movie, abused by fans at the field and all the way home, and in the newspapers and on the tv and radio thereafter. He gets death threats. It is so bad, he has to go into hiding, and doesn’t say a word in public, until this week…

The Cubs reached out to him and, having finally won the World Series last season, on Monday gave him a World Series ring, identical to the one the players receive.

“We hope,” the Cubs said, “this provides closure on an unfortunate chapter … While no gesture can fully lift the public burden he has endured for more than a decade, we felt it was important Steve knows he has been and continues to be fully embraced by this organisation.”

Bartman responded with equal graciousness, saying: “I humbly receive the ring not only as a symbol of one of the most historic achievements in sports, but as an important reminder for how we should treat each other in today’s society.”

The spirit of rugby lives

Early in the second half last Saturday, as the Kiama U13s were leading the Shamrocks 40-0, the fine Kiama coach decided it would be a better game to pull one of his players from the field. At 55-0, both coaches decided a new solution. The game was stopped, and some of the Shamrocks and Kiama boys swapped jerseys. Suddenly the game comes alive! Instead of a thrashing, it is a game. The boys grin, and chase, and tackle their own team-members like mad things, as the ball surges back and forth up the field and the spectators roar with appreciation.

“It was so memorable,” my spy says, “that a group photo was requested from parents from both sides. Thank you Shamrocks U13s and Kiama U13s for reminding us what playing with the spirit of rugby is truly about. It was a joy to watch.”

And that, friends, is rugby.

Shake of the head

I know, on concussion, I am a broken bloody record, am I right? But I am not the only one stunned that only a fortnight after Billy Slater was poleaxed against the Raiders, suffering brain trauma so bad he was unconscious for three minutes, with no memory of his last two weeks, he is still playing this weekend! Watching closely from Boston is Chris Nowinski, PhD, the Co-Founder & CEO of Concussion Legacy Foundation – driving force of the “Boston Brain Bank”, if you will, and the leading concussion activist in America. An outspoken critic of the way American sports rush their players back after being knocked out, and an expert in the consequences because it is his organisation which analyses the brains of deceased players – and documents the appalling high incidence of real brain damage – he is concerned to see the same pattern in .

Real risks: Sydney Seau, the daughter of former NFL player Junior Seau, poses with a bust of her father, whose brain was riddled with CTE. Photo: AP

He wrote me a long letter this week, expressing his concerns.

“Loss of consciousness for three minutes,” he wrote, “and lasting retrograde amnesia are concerning as each is extremely rare in a sports setting. If there is ever a case to be cautious with, it is this one.”

But no. Out you go, Billy, and let’s just hope you don’t take another hit like the last one, before your brain has had a chance to heal.

This is madness.

Medical madness. Moral madness. Legal madness.

The pay war winner

Glad they got the cricketer’s pay dispute sorted. The bloke who emerged with flying colours was David Warner, and TFF will be with him on the panel of Sports Sunday with Paul Gallen and Liz Ellis at 10am. Warner’s strength is he does not use weasel words, and tells it like it is – which in that pay dispute was most useful! What they said

Craig Foster on Les Murray: “The world lost a football colossus this morning, Les Murray AM. He fought well into extra time but whistle has blown. His legacy is lasting.”

Legend: Les Murray passed away this week. Photo: James Alcock

Swimmer Kyle Chalmers looking ahead: “It would be amazing to win the 4x200m on home soil next year [at the Commonwealth Games] and I think we are a good shot at that.” Oh, alright, I’ll be the dickhead and say it – it’s a living. “Home soil,” Kyle?

Like the n cricketers wearing their baggy greens at Wimbledon, Sergio Garcia now has a new favourite part of his wardrobe: “I will definitely be bringing the green jacket with me to the Gold Coast.”

Daniel Ricciardo unhappy with team-mate Max Verstappen after he took him out of the Hungarian Grand Prix: “F—ing sore loser. It was amateur to say the least. There was no room to pass . . . I don’t think he likes it when a team-mate gets in front.”

Speaking to NBC after the Hungarian Grand Prix, Nico Hulkenberg said of his clash with rival driver Kevin Magnussen: “I congratulated him for being the most unsporting driver of the whole grid once again. When it comes to racing, he’s just nasty . . . What he did there, opening up the steering, making me run wide, it’s just being an asshole basically. We had really nice words, he said (‘suck my balls’), that was his return, so it’s quite interesting with him.”What is it with all this racing aggro, all of a sudden?

Laurie Daley on Josh Dugan and Blake Ferguson getting pissed as newts, a few days before Origin III: “Did they do anything legally wrong? No they didn’t. Did we know they were going down to have a few beers? No we didn’t. Yes we knew they were going down to Lennox Head to meet up with a mate. Obviously we’ve done something wrong . . .”

Usain Bolt, who turns 31 later this month, gave an emphatic answer when asked how he would feel on Saturday night after his final, final 100m final:”Unbeatable. Usain Bolt has retired unbeatable over that event. For me that will be the biggest headline. Unbeatable and unstoppable.”

Unbeatable: Usain Bolt. Photo: AP

Patrick Dangerfield on being suspended after his tackle caused the “tackl-ee” to miss the rest of the game: “I respect the AFL for what they’re trying to do in trying to protect the head. Concussion is certainly something that we take very seriously as an industry and as a club.”

Stephen Mayne, a spokesman for the Alliance for Gambling Reform, on the average yearly pay of AFL players to $370,000: “This is partly funded by state-sponsored abuse in poor areas by dangerous and addictive [pokie] machines. This is going to be an issue at the upcoming annual general meetings of all these clubs, and the directors there had better be ready to explain themselves. Let the NRL be the pokies-dominated code . . . we are not the NRL, we are better than that.”

Richmond coach Damien Hardwick on former team-mate turned media pundit Kane Cornes: “Seriously I would love to see Kane, I would love to see Kane. Don’t get me wrong that’s his job, he’s there to write s–t comments.” Listen, Damo, it’s a living.

AFL CEO Gil McLachlan on the resignation of two employees, for having affairs with other staff. “I think our industry has a ??history of being forgiving and they are talented executives who made a mistake. They took full accountability. I think that when people take ??accountability for their errors, I think ns give people a second chance.” I think most ns think that if no sexual harassment was involved, and they weren’t doing anything rude in work time, it is none of your damn business, and certainly none of our damn business. Team of the week

The Matildas. Finally defeated the USA! And took apart Japan and Brazil for good measure.

Emily Seebohm. Won the one gold medal for at the World Swimming Championships in Budapest.

Karrie Webb. Wound back the clock with a 3rd place finish at the Scottish Open.

Nathan Walker. This year this young star is destined to be the first n to play ice hockey in the Big Show in the NHL.

Lions – Crusaders. Meet in the Super Rugby Final. Did not meet a Kiwi opponent before the semi-finals. Is it me, or that completely ludicrous? Does it not show that the format of this tournament is totally out of kilter?

The Olympics. Speaking of having passed high noon, with only two cities bidding for the 2024 games they gave them to Paris first up, and 2028 to LA as a consolation prize. 2032 is anyone’s guess, but the way things are heading, if Dubbo put up its hand, they might be a chance!

Jack Doohan. The 14-year-old son of n motorcycle legend Mick Doohan, has secured the biggest win of his European karting career. Won the Swedish leg of the European Championship in the OK-Junior class.

Peter Lonard. Aussie golfer finished 3rd at the Senior British Open

RIP. Les Murray. The beloved football commentator who, with Johnny Warren and Frank Lowy was one of the three most significant people in the country in putting their code on the map in Oz, passed away early this week. Well done, oh good and noble servant of the game.

Twitter: @Peter_Fitz

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Leaked Turnbull admission to Trump leaves refugees in despair

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Leaked Turnbull admission to Trump leaves refugees in despair, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Editorial: Turnbull put politics before welfare of refugeesComment: Leak reveals PM to be tough, skilled and indifferent to human sufferingThe full transcript of the Trump-Turnbull call
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Refugees and advocates are in despair over Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s admission, revealed in a leaked transcript, that Donald Trump could take as few as 100 or even zero refugees from Manus Island and Nauru under the US refugee deal.

They have also accused Mr Turnbull of lying when he insisted ‘s acceptance of refugees from Central America was unrelated to the US deal and did not constitute a “people swap”, claims that have been undermined by the leaked document.

During his explosive phone call with President Trump in January, a transcript of which was obtained by The Washington Post, Mr Turnbull won over the reluctant President by assuring him the US was not bound to accept a single refugee.

“The agreement … does not require you to take 2000 people. It does not require you to take any,” he told Mr Trump. “The obligation is for the United States to look and examine and take up to and only if they so choose – 1250 to 2000. Every individual is subject to your vetting.

“You can decide to take them or to not take them after vetting. You can decide to take 1000 or 100. It is entirely up to you. The obligation is to only go through the process.”

Those words have angered refugee advocates and alarmed refugees themselves, who were peacefully demonstrating on Friday afternoon under the close watch of police.

Refugee Action Coalition spokesman Ian Rintoul said the remarks showed “it has never been a substantial deal” and was “an appalling scam perpetrated on the refugees and the n people”.

Iranian refugee and journalist Behrouz Boochani, who is on Manus Island, described the arrangement as “a fake deal … to waste time”. “I’m sure that there is not any option to send people to America,” he said.

He said refugees were in despair as authorities begin to shut down the regional processing centre, which is due to close by October 31. “The situation is critical,” he said.

No refugees have been accepted by the US, however, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection told the Senate in May that dozens of refugees were now in the final stages of the application process.

Mr Turnbull on Friday noted the arrangement “has always been subject to American vetting procedures”. “It’s always better when these conversations remain confidential”, he said, but would not comment further on the “supposed transcript”.

During the phone call, Mr Turnbull linked the deal to ‘s acceptance of a group of Central American refugees living in Costa Rica. This agreement pre-dated the US deal and the government has denied the two arrangements amount to a “people swap”.

But Mr Turnbull promised President Trump that would “hold up our end of the bargain by taking in our country [people] that you need to move on from”. He went further, offering to “take anyone that you want us to take” as long as they did not arrive by boat.

The deal “requires, in return, for us to do a number of things for the United States”, Mr Turnbull said, without detailing the “things”.

Government sources insisted the two arrangements were negotiated separately and at different times. They said Mr Turnbull only raised the Central America matter to help convince President Trump to honour the deal.

But Labor and the Greens seized on the transcript as proof of a “people swap”, with shadow immigration minister Shayne Neumann calling on the government to “come clean”.

Greens immigration spokesman Nick McKim said Mr Turnbull had been caught telling “a very clear lie”.

“His confession to Trump that it is a people swap shows his duplicity and lays bare the contempt he has for the n people and the truth,” Senator McKim told Fairfax Media.

Government sources expressed confidence that the deal for the US to take screened refugees from Manus and Nauru would not be affected by the latest ructions caused by the leak of the transcript.

Sources also said that the relationship between Mr Turnbull and Mr Trump had been good during their subsequent meetings.

With David Wroe

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‘When I get that drunk my morals leave’: Anxious texts after alleged rape

12.12.2018, Comments Off on ‘When I get that drunk my morals leave’: Anxious texts after alleged rape, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

The site of the alleged assault on the grounds of St Johns College. Photo Supplied. Story Harriet AlexanderJean Claude Perrottet exchanged a flurry of text messages with his mates in the days after the 2015 St Johns College formal to find out what the friend who had invited him to the event knew about his encounter with another woman.
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He asked his friends whether they had spoken to his hostess and what she had said about him, explaining that he could not remember much of the night.

“I can’t get that drunk. When I get that drunk my morals leave,” he said in one message.

One of his friends said the only thing he heard was that Mr Perrottet had vanished. “So what happened?” he asked.

Mr Perrottet replied: “I just kissed someone.”

Mr Perrottet has pleaded not guilty in the NSW District Court to three counts of sexual assault over the events that transpired while he was separated from his friend that night.

The 20-year-old younger brother of NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet had been invited to the formal by a female student of the college, a platonic friend who their mutual friends wanted to become his girlfriend, although neither was romantically interested in the other.

He told one friend he had consumed too much alcohol because he did not know many people at the party, and the court heard that he met the woman who was to become his accuser on the dance floor.

She became the second woman he was to kiss that night while his hostess was socialising elsewhere.

Afterwards he led her by the hand to a tree canopy, where she says a number of sex acts occurred without her consent.

But Mr Perrottet says that the first two acts were consensual and that the third – sexual intercourse – did not take place.

He told police when he was arrested a few days later that there was “no way” sex had taken place because it was against his religion.

He told the court: “I believe you should wait until marriage.”

Police later overheard him telling his brother on the phone that it was “just second base” and “it was all consensual”.

Under cross-examination on Friday, Mr Perrottet conceded that the Catholic value of chastity should also have ruled out the sexual activity that he admitted had occurred.

He told his brother another sex act “may” have occurred rather than did occur to avoid his approbation, rather than because he had lost his memory, he told the court.

“The reason is because when he’d come home he’d get really angry at me and get me in trouble,” Mr Perrottet said.

He also denied that his text messages were based on anxiety that sexual assault allegations may have been levelled against him.

“I was freaking out because I was with [the complainant] all night and it was rude to do that when [my friend] was the one who asked me to the ball,” Mr Perrottet said.

Kissing a girl isn’t all that bad is it? “I don’t think it’s great to be just randomly kissing girls … if I didn’t know them, or talk to them first or ask them out for coffee.”

The trial continues.

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Chinan sporting codes at the crossroads

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Chinan sporting codes at the crossroads, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – OCTOBER 13: Steven Lowy of Westfield speaking with Robert Harley from AFR at The Westin on October 13, 2016 in Sydney, . (Photo by Christopher Pearce/Fairfax Media) SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – OCTOBER 13: Steven Lowy of Westfield speaking with Robert Harley from AFR at The Westin on October 13, 2016 in Sydney, . (Photo by Christopher Pearce/Fairfax Media)
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Professional sport in is at the crossroads: some have travelled so far down the corporate path, they are too business-oriented to be called a sport.

Others are retreating back along the amateur path, too inherently sport-minded to be considered a business.

The tortured delay in Cricket reaching a pay deal with its players; the indecision of the Rugby Union in sacking a team; the revolt by stakeholders of Football Federation ; rugby league’s problems in achieving a functioning independent commission and the AFL’s relentless push to be standard-bearers of social equity in the nation are evidence of this confusion.

John Wylie, an investment banker and chair of the n Sports Commission, has been active in taking the Olympic sports down the same route as the professional codes, installing businessmen with no elite experience in a sport as chairs.

Mining giant Rio Tinto, with its reputation for union-busting tactics, was seen as the ogre in CA’s problems in reaching an agreement with the n Cricketers Association. CA chair David Peever is a former managing director of Rio Tinto and recruited a Rio Tinto executive and an adviser to assist CA on the pay negotiations.

However, it would be a mistake to assume elite businessmen who take a ruthless approach to dealing with cricketers don’t love sport.

Peever, for example, was a frequent attendee at Storm home games until he moved inter-state.

Nevertheless, the brutal negotiations between CA and the ACA and the stratospheric salaries paid has produced the perception that ‘s favourite summer pastime is now more of a business than a sport.

By contrast, the inept leadership of the ARU by former NAB chief executive Cameron Clyne, in failing to cull an n Super Rugby team, has pushed the code back to its roots. Rugby union people now prefer to stroll down to a suburban oval to watch a game between amateur teams, while sipping on a beer and eating a hot dog.

Rugby union boasts it has the most corporately qualified and diverse board in , yet the failure of the code, when challenged by the demands of its international partners, exposes it as still too much of a sport to be a business.

Both rugby league and soccer face problems over governance, with demands from stakeholders for more power. The heads of both codes, the ARLC’s John Grant and FFA’s Steven Lowy, have demonstrated that their business skills have not been enough to achieve corporate stability.

Grant, a former Kangaroo, led a successful IT company but was effectively absent from the game for 20 years. This became an asset when the newly formed ARLC needed an independent chair. The code’s stakeholders, none of whom trusted each other, decided that no one could sit on the commission if he/she had been involved with rugby league in any way in the previous three years, apart from being a passive fan. The pendulum swung too far to business and the fans of the code have been seeking a saviour, one with a celebrated past in the sport, since.

Lowy, the chief executive of Westfield’s overseas investments, inherited the FFA’s chairman’s role from his father, Frank, one of ‘s richest individuals. The A-League clubs want greater representation on the congress that elects the board. Their owners are losing money but believe they have the gravitas of a Manchester United.

Ironically, that great bastion of sport/business ethics, FIFA, is sending out emissaries to end the sport’s civil war.

The AFL has its own links to Rio Tinto via recently retired chairman Mike Fitzpatrick and former AFL commissioner Chris Lynch, the mining giant’s CFO. The code boasts a national leadership role in promoting gender equity, Indigenous and refugee causes and gay rights. A cynic might suggest this is done with an eye on government grants. The AFL chairman, Richard Goyder, said, when replacing Fitzpatrick, “The AFL is more than a business because of the way that it reaches into all these communities.”

Goyder is the outgoing chief executive of Wesfarmers and the first chair of the AFL who has not played the game at the elite level. A former Wesfarmers chairman, Bob Every, sits on the board of Cricket .

The common thread in many of the appointments to the boards of professional sports is the promotion of independence over competence.

In the rush to recruit top business people, they have neglected what might be called the affection and affinity for a sport.

Furthermore, many of the corporate heavyweights are not accustomed to the intense – sometimes personal – scrutiny from the media. What might work in the corporate world doesn’t necessarily translate to the world of sport.

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CommBank ATM scandal syndicate linked to the biggest ice haul in WA history

12.12.2018, Comments Off on CommBank ATM scandal syndicate linked to the biggest ice haul in WA history, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

A police officer with the cash and drug haul linked to the money laundering syndicate Photo: WA PoliceOne of the money laundering syndicates linked with the Commonwealth Bank compliance scandal worked with drug smugglers who imported methamphetamine worth $315 million, the largest ice seizure in West n history.
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The Hong Kong-linked syndicate used the CBAto launder more than $21 million, according to the statement of claim filed by financial regulatory agency Austrac against CommBank.

It is believed Westpac was also used by the syndicate to wash drug money, but it is unclear what methods were used, and whether these have also drawn the attention of Austrac.

In September 2015, WA Police seized 321 kilograms of ice and more than $1.4 million in cash from the syndicate after a series of raids around Perth.

Most of the ice – enough for 3.2 million hits –was found in Chinese tea packaging inside 10 suitcases.

The launderers linked to the ice dealers are identified as “syndicate four” by Austrac.

One of the eight people charged in the syndicate is Wai Ki “Vicky” Fung.

West n police claimed the methamphetamine haul seized in September 2015 has a street value of $315 million Photo: WA Police

The syndicate was used by the drug traffickers to wash its money.

Fung was one of the first caught, carrying cash given to her via a middleman from Cheng Fatt Chow, who was near the head of the smuggling ring, theWest nreported.

Another of the syndicate members listed by Austrac as convicted over their role in money laundering, Yeuk Tung Kong, was on a student visa in Perth studying English.

Details of her case outlined during sentencing show the syndicate used underlings who needed money to make the deposits.

Yeuk was found to have made deposits totalling almost$2.5 million, being paid $200-$300 a day for nine days, in 2015.

She was also posted tins of Chinese tea containing almost two kilograms of ice.

“Your financial hardship was the main cause of your offending,” Justice Jeremy Allanson, who sentenced her to 7½ years’ prison in the WA Supreme Court last August, said.

“You have no known criminal history, you have no physical or mental health problems and, as I understand it, you do not use illicit drugs … the present offences are out of character.

“You needed money and you allowed yourself to be used.”

The Austrac claim outlines that about 20 people have been charged with criminal offences relating to money laundering which were enabled by CommBank.

Among those jailed for these offences were Arslan Shaffi and Salman Khan, who were sentenced last December and last March respectively.

One of the 10 accounts linked to the men was recorded as belonging to an unregistered charity with alleged links to radicalised figures.

Almost $2.9 million was deposited by the company, Austrac claims.

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Hunter Hero: Orange Sky to offer free laundry service to Newcastle’s homeless

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Hunter Hero: Orange Sky to offer free laundry service to Newcastle’s homeless, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Connections: Steve Middleton of Orange Sky Laundry, which provides homeless people with clean clothes and positive conversation. Picture: Simone De Peak
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THERE was a moment when Steve Middleton realised the remarkable power of small talk.

The realisation came alongside an Orange Sky Laundry, a van which provides a washing and drying serviceand a place of connection for homeless people, a serviceavailable across and now in Newcastle.

“Some of the stories we’ve heard around have really been eye-opening,” Mr Middleton said.

“There was one fellow, his name was Greg, and he hadn’t heard his own name in four days. That’s what he had said. No one spoke to him.”

Mr Middleton is Orange Sky Laundry’s Hunter co-ordinator and currently leads a team of 23 volunteers and growing.

While the Newcastle van officially launched last week, the concept began in 2014 and was the brainchild of Brisbane-based matesLucas Patchett and Nic Marchesi, who went on to be joint winners of the 2016 Young n of the Year Award.

The Newcastle van is Orange Sky’s 14th, with the mobile laundries also available in every capital city.

The philosophy behind it is that it takes at least one hour for the washing to finish, which Mr Middleton said is ideal time for a conversation with someone in need of a chat.

There are six chairs placed around the van to foster conversation.

“It just brings back dignity and connection like you wouldn’t believe,” Mr Middleton said.

“To go all day long with people literally turning their head away, and to come to one of our sites and just have people talk to you like you’re a normal human beingis a remarkable thing.”

Restoring dignity also extends to providing employment opportunities and creating responsibility, Mr Middleton said.

It is why the van will also operate as a commercial enterprise one day a week, with its operators to be Orange Sky’shomeless “friends”.

There is an emphasis on the use of the word “friend” to describe those who use Orange Sky.

“We recognise them as homeless because that’s the service we provide, but they are nevertheless our friends on the street,” Mr Middleton explained.

“If we think of them that way –as our friends on the street –rather than what people usually say about them –then it helps build that connection. That has huge outcomes.”

Orange Sky Laundry is half-funded through individual donations, with corporate sponsorship and grants making up the rest.

Its name comes from the songOrange Skyby Alexi Murdoch. The song is about helping your brothers and sisters.

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CBA scandal syndicate linked to the huge ice haul

12.12.2018, Comments Off on CBA scandal syndicate linked to the huge ice haul, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

One of the money laundering syndicates linked with the Commonwealth Bank compliance scandal worked with drug smugglers who imported methamphetamine worth $315 million, the largest ice seizure in West n history.
SuZhou Night Recruitment

The Hong Kong-linked syndicate used the CBA to launder more than $21 million, according to the statement of claim filed by financial regulatory agency Austrac against CommBank.

It is believed Westpac was also used by the syndicate to wash drug money, but it is unclear what methods were used, and whether these have also drawn the attention of Austrac.

In September 2015, WA Police seized 321 kilograms of ice and more than $1.4 million in cash from the syndicate after a series of raids around Perth.

Most of the ice – enough for 3.2 million hits – was found in Chinese tea packaging inside 10 suitcases.

The launderers linked to the ice dealers are identified as “syndicate four” by Austrac.

One of the eight people charged in the syndicate is Wai Ki “Vicky” Fung.

The syndicate was used by the drug traffickers to wash its money.

Fung was one of the first caught, carrying cash given to her via a middleman from Cheng Fatt Chow, who was near the head of the smuggling ring, the West n reported.

Another of the syndicate members listed by Austrac as convicted over their role in money laundering, Yeuk Tung Kong, was on a student visa in Perth studying English.

Details of her case outlined during sentencing show the syndicate used underlings who needed money to make the deposits.

Yeuk was found to have made deposits totalling almost $2.5 million, being paid $200-$300 a day for nine days, in 2015.

She was also posted tins of Chinese tea containing almost two kilograms of ice.

“Your financial hardship was the main cause of your offending,” Justice Jeremy Allanson, who sentenced her to 7?? years’ prison in the WA Supreme Court last August, said.

“You have no known criminal history, you have no physical or mental health problems and, as I understand it, you do not use illicit drugs … the present offences are out of character.

“You needed money and you allowed yourself to be used.”

The Austrac claim outlines that about 20 people have been charged with criminal offences relating to money laundering which were enabled by CommBank.

Among those jailed for these offences were Arslan Shaffi and Salman Khan, who were sentenced last December and last March respectively.

One of the 10 accounts linked to the men was recorded as belonging to an unregistered charity with alleged links to radicalised figures.

Almost $2.9 million was deposited by the company, Austrac claims.

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Variety Spin 4 Kids gives food for thought to ways to get more people active in the community

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Variety Spin 4 Kids gives food for thought to ways to get more people active in the community, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

TEAM EFFORT: Peter Haynes from Northern NSW Football with colleagues Jackie Murnain and Nyssa Suchanow took part in the six-hour Variety Spin 4 Kids challenge at Honeysuckle on Friday. Picture: Jonathan CarrollI had the privilege of taking part in the first ever Variety Spin 4 Kids lastFriday and there was a few things that struck me about the outdoor event.
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It was a six-hour team challenge on a spin bike, set at Harbour Square, Honeysuckle in fairly blustery conditions, to raise funds for disadvantaged children in the Hunter region.

In all, 36 teams signed up for the inaugural event, which Variety regional director Jason Bourke told me he plannedto make an annual fixture on their calendar.

In those 36 teams, which includedNewcastle businesses, sporting organisations and local identities, there were 300 people in total taking part.

One guy, Benn Coubrough of Stroke No Limits, took on the challenge solo.

As Ipedalledthrough my half-hour stint with Ladies in Lycra, I started thinking how great it would be to be able to do this every week.

The event was held first and foremost to help kids in need.Money raised funds VarietyHeart scholarships for talented Hunter children living with a disadvantage to reach their full potential.

Jason told me they had raised $35,000.

But that was just one positive aspect of the day.

It was a wonderful community event to be part of.

The atmosphere was electric with music blaring and teammates supporting and encouraging their ridersthroughout the day.

We are living in a time where obesity has become an epidemic and we need to be promotingphysical activity to more people as often as we can.

This was certainly a good advertisement for that and I spoke to a few participants on the day who agreed doing something like it on a regular basis would be a wonderful initiative for the city.

Obviously it wouldn’t be for six hours but a Friday lunchtime or afternoon outdoor spin session with the harbour as a backdrop would be fantastic.

A lot of businesses already have quite good health and well-being programs but a lot don’t and it was just such a good feeling seeing so many people being active.

Cycle classes have a lot of benefits for a range of people.

Not everyone can run.

But cycling is low impact and can be helpful when recovering from an injury or regaining fitness becauseyoucan work at your own pace.

Even sitting there spinning in a low gear is doing something.

According to www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au, the benefits of regular cycling include: “Increased cardiovascular fitness, increased muscle strength and flexibility, improved joint mobility, decreased stress levels, improved posture and coordination, strengthened bones, decreased body fat levels, prevention or management of disease and reduced anxiety and depression.”

No one at Harbour Square looked stressed last Friday.

If you are looking for a more adventurous cycle event, the Wollombi Wild Ride is coming up on September 2.It is a mountain bike event for riders of all abilities with 13.5km, 30km and 58km options.

GOING SOLO: Merewether’s Benn Coubrough took on the whole six-hour challenge by himself last week. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Winter Warmer Workout

There are 25days until spring. Last week I put out the challenge to try 30 minutes of physical activity for the month of August. That might be a combination of strength sessions andcardio workouts.

Interval sessions are a great way to get a solid workout in limited time. Interval training means to work at a different pace (harder then easier) for alternating periods.

Here is a 30-minute interval session you could do on the bike, in the pool, walking or running.

Hard 2min: easier 2min; 90sec: 90sec; 60sec: 60sec; 30sec: 30sec. Go back to the start. Continue for 30 minutes.

Upcoming Fitness EventsLake Macquarie Running Festival, August 27, Warners Bay:Sign up for a21.1km or 10.5km challenge. There is alsoa 4km kids event.www.lakemacrunning苏州夜总会招聘.

Wollombi Wild Ride, September 2, Wollombi:A recreational mountain bike event for riders of varying abilities. There is a mostly flat 13.5km for novices or a30km or 58km hilly course for the more adventurous and experienced. wollombiwildride苏州夜场招聘.

Fernleigh 15, October 22, Fernleigh track:Runners and walkers cancomplete the full length of the Fernleigh Track traffic-free. There is also a five-person relay option.www.runnsw苏州夜总会招聘.au.

Renee Valentine is a writer, qualified personal trainer and mother of three. [email protected]苏州夜总会招聘.au.

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