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‘You only need one good race a year; this will be mine’

12.12.2018, Comments Off on ‘You only need one good race a year; this will be mine’, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Rio, Brazil, August 2016. The Olympic 200 metres semi-final. Ella Nelson, from Sydney by way of Phoenix, Arizona, little-known outside of the wider Nelson and athletics family, lunges at the line.
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The clock stops sooner than she has ever halted it before in a half-lap race. She is exultant for, oh, a couple of minutes. During a TV interview she learns the cruel truth that she has missed the final … by one hundredth of a second. Her finest race on the biggest stage has left her short of being the first n woman since Mel Gainsford-Taylor and Cathy Freeman to make an Olympic track final by how much? Just 0.01s.

That amount of time in her race is, she has been reliably informed since, about the width of a dollar coin, or as a female teammate reportedly later kindly offered, about the difference of a padded bra. That didn’t make it any easier.

Regardless of the result, Nelson went from anonymous to eponymous in a race. She came to symbolise a new n team at that Games, the face of the next generation.

The disappointment of missing out has now dulled and the satisfaction of her achievement has replaced it.

“Rio was insane, it was crazy. It was the most amazing thing,” Nelson said in London ahead of the world athletics championships.

“I had the most fun there, even though I was so close to something so great there. It is a really good memory to look back on that I will cherish it for the rest of my life.

“I actually do [still watch the race], I have a motivational folder in my phone and it has got some races from when I was 15, obviously Rio, and some good ones from this year and even in the motivational ones I have chucked in the bad ones because you need to learn from those bad ones.”

On that basis Nelson has been doing some learning this year. Her Rio performance has not parlayed immediately into stronger and better performances. As head coach Craig Hilliard said, sometimes athletes peak then plateau or fall away and then rise again. The question of whether they rise again, or how far they rise, is up to them.

Nelson and her coach have a similar take on success and development saying it is not linear but winding, more roller-coaster than escalator.

“It has been an interesting year so far. It’s been tough, I’m not going to lie, but every year is different, that’s what everyone keeps telling me,” she said.

“Unfortunately I started the year with a sesamoid stress reaction so I was in a boot for eight weeks right after Rio. I just felt there was this never-ending injury cycle but it has ended, I’m injury free but just dealing with some other stuff [which she preferred not to expand on].

“I’ve spoken to quite a lot of athletes and well-known Olympians and they all say the year following is really difficult, sometimes sub-consciously, sometimes consciously … things have been tough.”

At nationals she ran a 23.91s, well down on the PB 22.5 she ran in Rio, and was beaten across the line by PNG-born Toea Wisil. She followed with some decent runs in the Caribbean but then had flat performances in Europe in the Diamond League.

“I wouldn’t say it was a shock [at nationals] but each race presents certain challenges and for me there was a lot of stuff going on behind the scenes and off track that looking back have played a bigger part than I initially realised,” she said.

“Regardless you only have to run well at one major championships and that is only once a year, whether it is the Olympics, the world championships or the Commonwealth Games, they are the big ones you really try to focus on.

“Obviously it’s nice to run well in every race but at the same time it can be unrealistic, not every race is going to be perfect.”

Of some comfort to her heading into London is that she also tore her hamstring twice last year before Rio and still found her best performance on the day it mattered most. She hopes for the same in London.

“Everyone keeps reminding me that I’m going to have a really long career and that every year is going to be different, sometimes you will be injury-riddled for a whole year, some years will be tough and you might not be racing as well but as I said earlier and I will continue to say until after world champs, you only have to run fast once.”

After returning to Phoenix with her training group and working on some very specific improvements she feels she is ready.

“I don’t want to say I’m back because I never went anywhere … I am around … I only have to run fast once and that’s at the worlds.”

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Joan gives cyclists a heads-up, magpie season is starting early

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Joan gives cyclists a heads-up, magpie season is starting early, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Heads up, magpie season is starting early Picture: Kylie Pitt
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Cyclist Joan Ferguson was attacked by a magpie while riding at cnr Alice and Alfred st, Sans Souci, the same place she was attacked two years ago. She said the magpie season seems to be starting early this year. The council has put a sign up warning people.Picture John Veage

Cyclist Joan Ferguson was attacked by a magpie while riding at cnr Alice and Alfred st, Sans Souci, the same place she was attacked two years ago. She said the magpie season seems to be starting early this year. The council has put a sign up warning people.Picture John Veage

Picture: Steven Siewert

Picture: Steven Siewert

Picture: Noel Hart

TweetFacebookVideo of a magpie attacking a cyclist. Warning: Some colourful language is used“Just after it attacked me it swooped on another cyclist across the road. I was able to warn her and she was able to get away avoid the magpie.

“It’s not mappie season yet, so they must be nesting early. They usually nest in September or October. But this one was out in the last week in July.

“It may be the same one that attacked me two years ago. They are very territorial and they remember faces.

“Last year I heard that a magie in the area pecked a man’s ear and left it bleeding.”

Joan said there are two permanent magpie warning signs installed by the council in Alice Street but is worried that cyclists could be unprepared for their early return.

“I just want to let cyclists and pedestrians know that a magpie has started swooping in the area earlier than usual and this one is very aggressive. I don’t want other people to be attacked.

“The best thing is to avoid the area altogether. I won’t be going back until December.

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The science teacher who let Pokemon Go in the classroom

12.12.2018, Comments Off on The science teacher who let Pokemon Go in the classroom, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

When Pokemon Go took over children’s screens last year and most teachers were struggling to keep it out of the classroom, a school on the NSW central coast decided to incorporate the popular game into their science lessons.
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After students at the International Football School in Kariong have “caught” the pokemon in the botanical garden using the augmented reality app on their phone, their science teacher will talk about the plants around them.

Students at the sports-focused school, which runs from kindergarten to year 12, are also encouraged to play other popular video games including Clash of the Clans and Ingress in the classroom to build their communication and teamwork skills.

“We’re using what the kids already like to do to get to our outcomes, the games are a conduit for discussions about other things,” the school’s head of curriculum Dean Groom said.

About half of n students are now using video games in the classroom, up from one-third in 2015, according to new national survey findings in the 2018 Digital report.

About 70 per cent of parents believe video games can be effective for teaching and motivating students at school, 64 per cent believe they can help students pay attention and 62 per cent believe they can help schools remain relevant.

The report’s lead author, Jeff Brand, said the growing acceptance of video games in schools is linked to a broader demographic of ns playing games at home.

About 93 per cent of households have gaming devices and 67 per cent of ns play video games. Of these, 77 per cent are aged 18 or over and the average age of a video game player is now 34, up from 24 in 2005.

“Kids and teachers in schools both play video games and 87 per cent of parents play games themselves,” Dr Brand said. “It makes them aware of [the potential of video games] and more conversations exist around game playing.”

Dr Brand said there is potential for games to be used “substantially” in the classroom.

“Ultimately, many things we learn through textbooks we will ultimately learn through video games,” he said.

“Most major textbook publishers now have in-house game developers. Some of the stuff that works best is what compels students and attracts their attention.”

Michelle Blight, a year 12 physics teacher at St George Christian School in Sydney’s south, is now using a video game while teaching the space component of the HSC curriculum.

“There’s a game called Kerbal Space Program that helps then understand the different aspects of rocket launch and re-entry,” Mrs Blight said.

Mrs Blight said she also uses video games in physics lessons for years 9, 10 and 11.

“Where [games] match curriculum objectives they can be quite useful because of the motivational aspect,” she said.

“Kids don’t realise they’re learning things while they’re playing.”

Mrs Blight said teachers and parents have become more accepting of video games in the classroom in recent years.

“It’s about us becoming more familiar with these opportunities. But I’ve spoken to people with all different opinions.

“Some are really keen about games and think they help equip students with not only content material but computer and IT skills as well, while others are concerned more about how much screen time students are engaging with.”

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NRL Round 22: St George Illawarra Dragons v South Sydney RabbitohsPhotos

12.12.2018, Comments Off on NRL Round 22: St George Illawarra Dragons v South Sydney RabbitohsPhotos, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

NRL Round 22: St George Illawarra Dragons v South Sydney Rabbitohs | Photos Robbie Farah of the Rabbitohs (right) runs with the ball as Gareth Widdop of the Dragons challenges during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir
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Bryson Goodwin of the Rabbitohs (centre) celebrates with his team mates after scoring a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Gareth Widdop (centre) and his team mates stand together after Bryson Goodwin of the Rabbitohs scored a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Bryson Goodwin of the Rabbitohs (left) celebrates scoring a try with his team mates during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Sam Burgess of the Rabbitohs looks back at the referee as he is sent off during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Joel Thompson of the Dragons scores a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Nene Macdonald of the Dragons scores a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Cody Walker jumps on team mate Bryson Goodwin of the Rabbitohs (centre) to celebrate after Goodwin scored a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Kurt Mann of the Dragons (centre) celebrates with his team mates after scoring a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Joel Thompson of the Dragons is tackled as he runs with the ball during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Tyson Frizell of the Dragons is tackled as he runs with the ball during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Bryson Goodwin of the Rabbitohs is tackled as he runs with the ball during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Alex Johnston of the Rabbitohs scores a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Cody Walker of the Rabbitohs runs with the ball into the Dragons defence during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Alex Johnston of the Rabbitohs (right) celebrates scoring a try during the Round 22 NRL match between the St George Illawarra Dragons and South Sydney Rabbitohs at the SCG in Sydney, Friday, August 4, 2017. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

TweetFacebook​Photos from the NRL Round 22 game between the St George Illawarra Dragons and the South Sydney Rabbitohs.

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How a simple visit to a chemist for medicines containing codeine just got a lot harder

12.12.2018, Comments Off on How a simple visit to a chemist for medicines containing codeine just got a lot harder, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Community support: Pharmacist Judy Plunkett is warning the community about plans to have patients get a prescription from their GP for medicines containing codeine.
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The decision to upschedule medicines containing codeine will see patients required to visit their GP for a prescription or a hospital’s accident and emergency department.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration decision comes into effect on February 1, 2018.

Pharmacist Judy Plunkett, who is also a member of The Pharmacy Guild NSW, says the decision will cause chaos, choke up GP waiting rooms and put added pressure on hospital outpatient departments.

“This decision will create a huge problem and it will be the people with acute pain who will sufferthe most,” she says.

The medicines that will be affected include, paracetamol + codeine 500mg + <15mg which includes Panadeine, Panadeine Extra and Mersyndol; Ibuprofen + codeine 200mg + <15mg which includes Nurofen Plus and Panafen Plus; Aspirin + codeine 300mg + <15mg which includes Aspalgin, Codis Disprin Forte; and cough and cold medicines, which includes Codral Original Cold and Flu, Demazin day and night cold and flu.

These products are currently available over the counter after speaking to a pharmacist, Mrs Plunkett said.

“My pharmacy is open seven days and we treat acute patients every single day of the week.

“There are more than one million people that use codeine products responsibly.

“Pharmacists are experts at managing this generalised form of pain and the community understands that.”

Mrs Plunkett said pharmacists understand the nuanced treatment systems available to address the level of pain experienced without the patient getting addicted.

The pharmacist said the guild have been proactive in the area of recording codeine product use for some time though a system called MedsASSIST.She said there had been a 70 per cent take up of the system.

Pharmacist Judy Plunkett

It is understood the TGA decision to upschedule the medicines was taken because they can be addictive and are being used inappropriately by some patients with chronic pain.

Mrs Plunkett said The Pharmacy Guild of and its NSW counterpart will tackle the issueon a number of fronts.

“We will be asking the state government to allow pharmacists to use an ‘except when’ situation. This would enable a pharmacist to provide a three day course of pain relief to patients suffering acute pain.

“This would also be in conjunction with 100 per cent mandatory MedsASSIST live recording. We would also have pharmacists undergo additional training in acute pain management,” she said.

“If we cannot get this ‘except when’ clause introduced then we will be asking the state government to push back the February 2018 deadline.”

She also suggested the community should start lobbying their local MP.

Mrs Plunkett said a 100 per cent use of the on-line live recording system would also help monitor any concerns about so-called doctor shopping.

“We can also block the sale of these medicines and send the patient back to their doctor if we see any health issues or over-use,” she added.

The pharmacist said the guild’s push was based around better pain management and providing the best health outcome to the patient.

“It’s using technology and finding a modern world solution to stop people abusing drugs and provide proper monitoring.”

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Assistant Commissioner Max Mitchell takes the helm as Northern Region commander

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Assistant Commissioner Max Mitchell takes the helm as Northern Region commander, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

ON THE JOB: Home is where the heart is … Assistant Commissioner Max Mitchell has taken over as the Northern Region’s top cop. Picture: Marina NeilNEWCASTLE’S Max Mitchell says he’s back where he belongs.
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“Newcastle is home,” he said.

“It’s been quite hectic, from start to finish each day, but the most important thing is that I have a smile on my face because I’m not in Sydney.”

Assistant Commissioner Mitchell, the former chief of Newcastle City Local Area Command, was back in familiar territory this week, after formally taking the reigns as the Northern Region commander – responsible for the fight on crime in an area stretching from the Brooklyn Bridge to the Queensland border.

Mr Mitchell takes the helm from former Northern Region commander Jeff Loy, who was promoted to deputy commissioner in May, as part of Commissioner Mick Fuller’s new leadership team.

The region’s new top cop, who most recently served as the first commander of the Police Transport Command, said he takes the job at a time of extraordinary change in the organisation.

Overall crime is down, according to the statistics, but workloads are up. The nature of crime is evolving, with cyber offences and fraud more more prevalent in the digital era.

And, Mr Mitchell says, police need to be more involved with tackling social issues such as homelessness, drug and alcohol addictionand youth unemployment, and raisingmental health awareness, than ever before.

‘We’ve got to keep up with change’: Assistant Commissioner Max Mitchell. Picture: Marina Neil

“We’ve got to keep up with change because, as we all know, change is dynamic right now,” he said.

One of the biggest changes on the horizon could see an overhaul of the structure of the Hunter’s law enforcement.

Top brass are in active discussion about merging some commands, with reduction of upper management seen as a way of boosting “boots on the ground”.

Quizzed about the changes, Mr Mitchell said “a number of options are on the table”.

“[But]right at this point in time there has been no decisions made,” he said.“Right now we are in that embryo stage of what are the opportunities.”

Mr Mitchell said reducing road trauma, violent crime, sexual assaultsand continuing a crackdown on outlaw motorcycle gangs would be a priority for the command.

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Robert Dillon: Sporting Declaration

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Robert Dillon: Sporting Declaration, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

WHEN was the last time a rugby league team collected the wooden spoon andfans remembered the season as a success, rather than a dismal failure?
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HARD YARDS: The Newcastle Knights’ win against St George Illawarra last weekend was a reward for persistence. Picture: Darren Pateman, AAP

The only such instance this columnist can recall was in 2005, when the Newcastle Knights salvaged some pride from what was, at that point, the worst campaign in the club’s history.

Depleted by the off-season departures of players like Ben Kennedy, Timana Tahu, Robbie O’Davis, Matt Parsons and Michael Ennis, and riddled with injuries, Newcastle endured a 13-game losing streak to open the year.

Eventually, boosted by the return of champion Andrew Johns, they regrouped to rack up eight wins from their final 11 games, including six in a row at one point.

That season is still widely regarded by most Knights supporters as a triumph, despite it culminating in the game’s most dubious “prize”.

It was also a catalyst for a vastly improved season in 2006, when Newcastle finished in the top four after their preliminary rounds, and then won their first play-off.

Now the Knights of 2017 have a chance to emulate their counterparts of 12 seasons ago.

With five rounds remaining, it is clearly going to take some sort of minor miracle for Newcastle to avoidan unwanted page in rugby league’s annals –three consecutive wooden spoons.

There was a glimmer of hope after last week’s uplifting win against the Dragons, but then the Tigers responded 24 hours later with their upset win on the Gold Coast to retain their two-win buffer above the competition cellar dwellers.

Still, where there is life, there is hope. Maybe last week was an indication that the footballing gods have decided the Knights deserve a break. Regardless of which rung they end up occupying on the competition ladder, the next five games could well determine how 2017 is remembered by the Novocastrian faithful.

At this point, the consensus is that their young troops have competed in most games, improved significantly on last season and, most importantly, refused to throw in the towel.

Thevictory against the Dragons was a reward for perseverance, even if it wasn’t their most complete performance.

The challenge now for Nathan Brown’s troops is to tick another couple of boxes before their season is done.

Back-to-back wins –for the first time in almost two years –would be a good place to start. A win away from home would also be a milestone.

Realistically, if five or six wins had been offered before a ball was kicked, I suspect most supporters would have taken that as an acceptable result.

Newcastle are still a couple of victories short of that, albeit after allowing at least two matchwinning leads –at Kogarah and Belmore –to slip through their fingers.

As they showed last weekend, you make your own luck. If they keep turning up with the same attitude and commitment –and there is no reason to suspect they won’t –anything is possible between now and season’s end.

Alternatively, if the Knights areunable to win another game this year and cop some heavy beatings in the run home, the progress they appear to have made might be overshadowed.

The bottom line is that, while supporters are rightfully looking forward to next season, there is still plenty to play for in the next five weeks.

As was the case in 2005, sometimes the team who lose the most games deserve a genuine round of applause.

Fairytale inSuzy’s sightsDURING her illustrious basketball career, disappointments have been few and far between for Suzy Batkovic.

One major regret was her inexplicable omission from last year’s Rio Olympics, a decision that quite possibly cost a medal.

CHAMPION: Suzy Batkovic.

Her only other unfulfilled dream, playing for her home town in the national league, now appears feasible.

If Newcastle Basketball can produce a business plan to complement their new stadium, a WNBL franchise could be a reality for the 2018-19 season.

And there could surely be no better choice for the inaugural captain than our home-grown three-time Olympian.

Neymar hits the jackpotALMOST $750 million. That’s what they are saying Brazilian striker Neymar will cost Paris Saint Germain, in both transfer fees and wages.

It’s a mind-bogglingamount of money for a player and a reminder that the round-ball code has become a game of Monopoly.

CASHING IN: Neymar.

I can remember being in England in the mid-1990s, when Blackburn Rovers paid a record transfer fee of£5 million to sign striker Chris Sutton.

At the time, it was labelled a ridiculous gamble, but Sutton’s goals helped them win their only Premier League title. It remains to be seen if Neymar can have a similar impact in Paris.

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Enjoy it while you can: China’s ski industry faces ‘terrifying’ future

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Enjoy it while you can: China’s ski industry faces ‘terrifying’ future, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Gerard Rampal scientific officer with Snowy Hyro treks in to measure the snow depth and weigh the sample to determine the water content at the Spencers Creek snow course sample site at 1830m above sea level in Kosciuszko national Park Thursday 9 June 2011. Photo by Andrew Meares / Fairfax Gerard Rampal scientific officer with Snowy Hyro treks in to measure the snow depth and weigh the sample to determine the water content at the Spencers Creek snow course sample site at 1830m above sea level in Kosciuszko national Park Thursday 9 June 2011. Photo by Andrew Meares / Fairfax
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Story by: Steve CauchiPhoto: Ken Irwin KEN 6th September 2012 The Sunday Age. Poster The Pygmy possum.

‘s ski resorts face the prospect of a long downhill run as a warming climate reduces snow depth, cover and duration. The industry’s ability to create artificial snow will also be challenged, scientists say.

Resorts are also going to become more reliant on big snow dumps such as this weekend’s blizzard – after a poor start to the season – as the frequency of smaller, top-up snowfalls diminish.

A snow retreat has been observed for half a century, with rising temperatures rather than reduced precipitation to blame, according to a major CSIRO-Bureau of Meteorology report. Under high greenhouse gas emissions pathway, snow at lower-elevation sites such as Mt Buffalo could all but disappear by 2050.

Warming springs have led to stark impacts at the end of the ski season. Early October snow depths fell 30 per cent during the 2000-13 period compared with 1954-99, a separate study in 2015 found.

Snow is a “threshold variable”. A slight temperature rise can turn snowflakes into rain that washes away, rather than adds to, snow cover.

That’s why all climate projections point in one direction, says Tom Remenyi, a researcher at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre. It’s both “encouraging and terrifying” that observations have matched models, giving researchers confidence about their bleak predictions, he said.

Reduced average snow depth at Spencers Creek in the Snowy Mountains. ‘Step change’

“What we’re fearing is that at some point, it’s not going to really snow that much any more. There’s going to be a step change,” Dr Remenyi said.

“The models say the paradigm shift will happen in the next 10-20 years.”

Those blasted in this weekend’s snow storms might wonder if snow will be in short supply, with as much as a metre expected for some resorts.

Sonya Fiddes, a researcher at Melbourne University’s n-German Climate and Energy College who led a study on n snow trends, says that big dumps will still happen but warmer air and follow-up rains means the snow “probably won’t stick around”.

“The projected trends are for declining rainfall for south-eastern , and an increase in extreme events,” Ms Fiddes said.

Dr Remenyi concurs, noting models point to a 20 per cent drop in precipitation by the end of the century. Alpine summers may collect more rainfall – in fewer, larger events – but other seasons will see a decline.

The Victorian government is preparing a report in the future of alpine communities and the ski industry later this year.

NSW is working with the University of NSW to assess changing climate and snowmaking conditions, with research due out late this year or early 2018. Industry view

Colin Hackworth, chief executive of the n Ski Areas Association, said the $1.5 billion industry has long recognised “if you have no snow, you have no business”. Investments in snowmaking dates from the 1980s.

Popular resorts such as Mt Buller in Victoria have managed to extend operational days from about 100 in the 1970s to 106 in a typical year now, even with less natural snow. Diversification has also brought in “snow tourists”, with many visitors just heading to the mountains to seek the white stuff rather than to ski or snowboard, he says.

“The industry is remarkably resilient,” Mr Hackworth said. “It’s a mature industry but it’s growing every year.”

Nor are resorts denying global warming is serious. Thredbo in NSW recently hosted a Protect Our Winters event “to raise awareness of the impact of climate change on our mountain environment”.

And Vail Resorts, which operates Perisher, calls climate change “one of the most significant challenges facing every country, every business and every person on our planet”. It aims for a zero environmental footprint by 2030.

Challenges, though, are only likely to intensify. Snow guns are becoming less efficient as humidity rises, reduce output of artificial snow by as much as 70 per cent as they ice up, Dr Remenyi said.

New “snow factories” have been introduced to Mt Buller and Mt Selwyn in Victoria, and more are likely. They create ice shavings with longer durability than gun-fired snow.

But warming temperatures will raise costs to maintain artificial snow cover, Dr Remenyi said. A study he helped write on the potential impact of climate change on Victoria’s resorts found that “by 2020- 2030 conditions suitable for snowmaking are projected to decline substantially”.

Expected reduction in snow-making hours at key Victorian resorts. ‘Fragile ecology’

And as the NSW Nature Conservation Council notes in a new study on the effects of a warming planet, impacts in alpine regions aren’t restricted to humans’ winter pastimes.

The endangered pygmy possum, for instance, has had its range shrunk to a little as 10 square kilometres.

“The wildlife that lives in the snowfields are at the front line of global warming because they are so sensitive to rising temperatures and changed snowfall patterns,” Kate Smolski, council chief executive, said.

“If deep, long-lasting snow cover disappears, the fragile ecology of snowfields will unravel because the plants and animals that live there have nowhere else to go.”

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The surprising spots young Sydneysiders are flocking to

12.12.2018, Comments Off on The surprising spots young Sydneysiders are flocking to, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

Many assume millennials are perennial renters lured to Sydney’s inner-city suburbs for the smashed avocado but new data paints a different picture of whereour 25- to 34-year-olds are living.
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In the past 10 years, it’s suburbs in Sydney’s middle-ring, to the west of the city, that have seen the biggest surge in this younger demographic, census data shows.

In particular, council areas like Strathfield, Cumberland, Burwood, Parramatta and Ryde were all within the top 10 growth areas for this age group.

Now, there’s the same proportion of millennials in Parramatta – 20.2 per cent – as there is in the Inner West, which declined over the same time period.

In 2006 in Strathfield LGA, which includes suburbs like Strathfield, Homebush and parts of Greenacre, 15.8 per cent of people were aged 25 to 34. A decade later, this has jumped to 23.1 per cent.

Meanwhile, in Mosman, this same demographic declined – from 14.4 per cent to 12 per cent.

And while part of it is clearly an issue of affordability, there’s also an attitudinal change emerging around home ownership.

“Home ownership isn’t the goal for everyone any more,” said David Chen, 27, who rents in a sharehouse in the north-west Ryde suburb of Eastwood.

He’s what most would call a “young professional” – a mortgage broker and a property “rentvestor”, renting even while owning two investment properties.

But the thought of buying a home to actually live in isn’t a priority.

“I don’t want to be tied down to one location by a home … I don’t want to be restricted in what I can do and where I can live,” he said.

And as a broker he knows there’s a significant proportion of Gen Y “with a lot of savings, but without any property” who are calling these middle-ring suburbs home.

“Thirty to forty years ago, people who were 27 would be settling down and having kids. Nowadays, people are single for longer and the need for home ownership is a bit different,” he said.

“Eastwood is convenient … it’s near the city, near to where everyone [in the sharehouse] works, including Parramatta.”

In the suburb of Eastwood, 17.6 per cent of people are 25 to 34 years old – the largest cohort of people in the suburb.

Mr Chen’s decision to invest, rather than buy a home, seems to be favoured among his age group, with a survey from Galaxy Research finding 78 per cent of Gen Y thought this was a “good” option. This compared to 66 per cent of the traditionalist generation.

Their reasons? It was cheaper to own an investment property than a home – and their lifestyle was different.

Now, “times have changed” due to the busy pace of life, non-bank lender State Custodians general manager Joanna Pretty said.

“Young people are now settling down later … or else they’re taking their time to consider their next move and focusing on other things like their career or travel, so they’re entering the market later.”

First Home Buyers co-founder Taj Singh found the figures around Ryde and Parramatta “no surprise” with many younger Sydneysiders opting for areas further out than they would have in the past.

Areas that have become “unit heavy” after an apartment development boom were those reporting the biggest proportional increase in young people, largely due to transport, location and proximity to employment and the city.

This describes Parramatta in particular, where those aged 25 to 34 jumped from 29,521 people in 2006 to 45,775 people in 2016.

The attraction to these areas is clearly due to the location of good jobs in the CBD, University of NSW demographer Alison Taylor said.

But it could also be because “other age groups are moving out” – with increases only in the 25 to 34 and the 55 to 64 age brackets, she said.

Some of the growth would be coming from younger working-age people “moving in from overseas”.

But the data also questions the theory of young adults staying at home longer, despite home ownership rates falling dramatically in the past decade for those under 40.

Many of the most expensive areas actually saw a decline in the proportion of older millennials – including the Hills Shire, North Sydney, Northern Beaches, Mosman, Woollahra and Waverley.

Lower-priced far-flung areas showed a modest increase, including Fairfield, Penrith, Blacktown, Camden, Canterbury Bankstown and Campbelltown.

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Newcastle sports wrap up: NNSW NPL, Women’s Premier League, NHRU, Newcastle RL, Black Diamond AFL, Newcastle Open Netball, Horse Racing

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Newcastle sports wrap up: NNSW NPL, Women’s Premier League, NHRU, Newcastle RL, Black Diamond AFL, Newcastle Open Netball, Horse Racing, 苏州桑拿会所, by .

GREAT CATCH: Maitland fly-half Pat Batey takes the ball off the boot of Nelson Bay opposite Charles Fielder in the Blacks 45-15 win at Marcellin Park. Picture: Michael HartshornNHRUMerewether moved alongside Lake Macquarie in fifth place as the top two teams were brought back to earth.
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The Greens powered past University 52-34. But it wasn’t enough to leapfrog the Roos, who scored two tries in the final 10 minutes to snatch a 37-all draw with Hamilton at Walters Park.

Southern Beaches bounced back to form with a hard-fought 20-14 win over Wanderers to claim the Tony Wansey Shield.

The Waratahs thrashed Singleton 52-22 and Maitland were too strong for Nelson Bay 45-15at Marcellin Park.

NNSW FOOTBALL NPLMaitland kept their faint finals hopes alive with a 2-1win over Lambton Jaffas at Edden Oval.

The Magpies trialed 1-0 at half-time but stormed home with goals to Liam Thornton and Jye Mackellar.

Edgeworth strengthened their push for a third straight minor prmiership with a redounding 5-0 win over Valentine at Cahill Oval. Brody Taylor, Dylan Holz, Will Bower, Daniel McBreen and Keigo Moriyasu) hit the target.

Herald Women’s Premier LeagueDefending champions Warners Bay will take a comfortable 4-2 lead into the second leg of their home-and-away semi-final against Mid North Coast after winning in Taree on Saturday.

Warners Bay led 3-0 at the break after goals to captain Nadja Squires, defender Brooke Miller and striker Jenna Kingsley.

Player-coach Cassidy Davis extended the lead to 4-0 early in the second period before the hosts hit back with two goals of their own.

Mid North Coast will need to win by three goals in the second leg to advance to the decider.

Adamstown are at home to Merewether on Sunday in the opening leg of their semi-final.

NEWCASTLE RLLeaders Western Suburbs bounced back to form with a hard fought 28-18 win over Cessnock at Cessnock Sportsground. The Rosellas lead 12-6 at half-time.

GANG TACKLE: The Maitland defence swarm in to wrap up the ball in the Pickers 22-14 win at Coronation Oval.

Maitand produced one of the upsets of the season to beat second placed Macquarie 22-14 at Coronation Oval. The Scorpions led 10-6 at half-time.

BLACK DIAMOND AFLTerrigal Avoca hung on to beat a fast-finishing Newcastle City 9.14-68 to 9.11-65 at No.1 Sportsground.

They Blues are now two wins behind Cardiff second-placed Cardiff, who accounted for Nelson Bay 15.9-99 to 5.6-36at Hillsborough Oval.

Warners Bay kept their slim finals hopes alive with a 10.11-71 to10.5-65victory overcellar dwellers Killarney Vale at Adelaide St.

NEWCASTLE OPEN NETBALLMaryville Tavern missed a place in the final after going down 60-34 to South Lions in the final round.

In other games, minor premiers Wests were too good for Junction Stella 66-19, BNC accounted for Nova Thunder 43-29and Forsythes accounted for Souths Pride 32-29.

HORSE RACINGNewcastle trainer Kris Lees trained the quinella in the group 2 Missile Stakes (1200m) at Randwick with Invincible Gem defeating favourite and stablemate Le Romain. The Monstar, for Scone trainer Brett Cavanough, was third.

Lees earlier won with ​Wahng Wah and he also had second placings on the program with Launch Code and Admiral Jello.

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