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Cameron won’t ask Mumford to tone down aggression

01.14.2019, Comments Off on Cameron won’t ask Mumford to tone down aggression, 苏州夜生活, by .

Greater Western Sydney coach Leon Cameron won’t be asking Shane Mumford to tone down his aggressive style after the Giants got their mojo back in the run to the finals.
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The Giants hammered the Melbourne Demons but Mumford could be rubbed out for next week’s showdown with the Western Bulldogs following two separate incidents.

Mumford faces an anxious wait for the match review panel’s call after he slung Corey Maynard to the turf and collected Max Gawn in the head with a shoulder.

It’s Cameron’s only headache after the Giants returned to form in emphatic fashion with a 14.13 (97) to 10.2 (62) win in front of another full house at Manuka Oval on Saturday afternoon.

But the Giants mentor won’t be asking his star ruckman to change the way he plays, saying Mumford’s aggression is pivotal in the club’s charge towards a maiden premiership.

“I probably get asked that every time Shane plays,” Cameron said.

“It was fantastic having him at his aggressive best. I thought those two players in Gawn and Mumford had an outstanding duel. Gawn kicked a goal early but it was great that Mummy’s inside work was terrific.

“We need him playing in that aggressive manner. I prefer him to play on edge like he did today and hopefully he should be fine.

“I thought he played in the right manner today Shane, and definitely helped our mids.”

Mumford had an epic ruck duel with Melbourne star Gawn and will be keen to replicate his dominance over the Bulldogs from earlier this season but the Giants have a readymade replacement if he cops a ban.

Dawson Simpson deputised in Mumford’s absence last week and Cameron believes his second choice ruckman will be able to shoulder the load if needed.

“Obviously that’s subjective in terms of Mumford’s availability, but Dawson was unlucky to come out of the side,” Cameron said.

“He played some really good footy, he’s got great spirit, great heart, which is exactly what we need. I hope I don’t have to make that decision but if it happens then Dawson Simpson is an absolutely perfect replacement because he has a crack.

“At 28 years old he’s actually defying a bit of logic in playing some great footy as a ruckman. He was unlucky to not to play today, but who knows, in the coming weeks he might get his spot.”

A second straight Canberra clean sweep pushes the Giants into second on the premiership table, a status that defies their horror injury toll.

It sends a huge message to the rest of the competition and leaves the Demons locked in a mad scramble with four other clubs to keep in touch with the top eight.

But now the challenge is to back it up against the reigning premiers who are fighting to stay in touch with the top eight.

“We know some of [the Giants players] have been up and down in and out of form so the confidence has probably taken a hit over the last month,” Cameron said.

“It’s a ruthless competition. We sit here and we’re happy because we got the four points and we played in a manner for three quarters better than we probably had for most of the year.

“It doesn’t get easier, we play the Dogs next Friday night and there’s a reason why they’re the premiers from last year. They’re playing some really good footy and if we don’t turn up and tackle really well next week, I’ll be in a press conference with a loss.”

AT A GLANCE

GWS GIANTS 8.6 10.7 13.12 14.13 (97)

MELBOURNE DEMONS 3.0 5.1 7.1 10.2 (62)

Goals: GWS: Delidio, Coniglio, Scully, Himmelberg, Kelly 3, Johnson 2, Shiel, Ward, Mumford, Smith 2. Melbourne: Gawn, Neal-Bullen 2, Tyson, McDonald, Pedersen, Watts, Melksham 2, Maynard

Best:

Josh Kelly 9

Stephen Coniglio 8

Shane Mumford 7

Callan Ward 7

Max Gawn 7

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Mansion of former energy boss passes in at $9.25m

01.14.2019, Comments Off on Mansion of former energy boss passes in at $9.25m, 苏州夜生活, by .

Linc Energy’s Peter Bond.BRW(NO CAPTION INFORMATION PROVIDED)A sprawling Brisbane estate has passed in at auction for less than it sold for almost a decade ago.
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The extravagant Fig Tree Pocket mansion, owned by former Linc Energy boss Peter Bond, failed to sell at auction on Saturday, despite lengthy negotiations.

The seven-bedroom, nine-bathroom mansion passed in at $9.25 million, $250,000 short of what Mr Bond bought it for in 2008.

It was previously listed for sale last year with an asking price of $11.9 million but was withdrawn from the market.

The estate sits on 1.2 hectares of riverfront land, and boasts an indoor water feature, automatic doors, and double-story floor to ceiling windows looking out toward the river.

The home has been called “one of the most substantial properties in Brisbane” in the past.

Mr Bond said he was selling because he planned to leave Queensland, after Linc Energy collapsed in May last year.

Bidding started at $8 million. There were two bidders, and competition slowed at $9 million before eventually stopping at $9.25 million.

During about 30 minutes of negotiations, an agreement between Mr Bond and the buyers could not be reached.

“We wouldn’t have spent the time on it if the difference was cattle stations,” auctioneer Haesley Cush said. “To see bidding in Brisbane over eight million bucks is a wonderful sign for the Brisbane market.

“Most of those properties sell in a backroom somewhere, and rarely do you get open transparency at this end of the market.”

Ray White New Farm principal Matt Lancashire declined to comment, but said he would continue to work with the highest bidder. Related: Squash world champ’s beachfront home for saleRelated: Derelict Sydney home sells for $1.26 millionRelated: Tiny cottage in Melbourne sells for $1,175,000

Later on Saturday in Wooloowin, an old, rundown Queenslander built in the 1930s went to auction for the very first time.

“It was a family home of a lady who lived there her whole life,” Ray White Bridgeman Downs agent Sonya Treloar said. “She passed away and she left it to her son. He sold to a couple and they had a DA put on it to restore the whole home.”

A change in circumstances with the vendors’ business meant they had to sell the house with the plans in place, which attracted a lot of attention from buyers.

The auction kicked off with a bid of $700,000, but shot up as potential buyers started piling on. It was announced on the market shortly after passing $820,000, and eventually sold to Clayfield couple Scott and Mel Baker for $841,000.

“We’re pretty stoked,” Mr Baker said of the pair upsizing from an apartment.

While the couple weren’t looking for a property to renovate, they felt the old home was too good an opportunity to pass up.

“To be perfectly honest with you, we were chasing a finished house,” Mr Baker said. “My brother’s an architect and my dad’s a builder so we saw this house and the potential that it has and we saw those views and they were just spectacular. That’s what sold us.”

Mr Baker said he felt like it was meant to be. “It just so happened that our [price] limit is what we won it for. It’s a bit serendipitous, I guess you could say.”

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Black Diamond AFL: Newcastle City won’t rest players in pivotal final roundphotos

01.14.2019, Comments Off on Black Diamond AFL: Newcastle City won’t rest players in pivotal final roundphotos, 苏州夜生活, by .

City won’t rest players in pivotal final round | photos CLOSE: Max Quinlan and Courtney Knights celebrate a goal in Newcastle City’s nail-biting loss to Terrigal Avoca at No.1 Sportsground on Saturday.
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TweetFacebook Newcastle City v Terrigal AvocaPictures: Max Mason-HubersNewcastle City coach Mitchell Knight says he will not rest healthy players in this weekend’s final round against Warners Bay as the Bulldogs strive for a place in the Black Diamond AFL semi-finals.

The Blues are already assured of third place, but the Bulldogs must beat the defending champions at Feighan Park on Saturday and hope fourth-placed Nelson Bay loseto cellar dwellers Killarney Vale.

Warners Bay kept their faint hopes alive with a 10.11 (71) to10.5 (65) victory over the Bombersat Adelaide St Oval on Saturday and now have a superior points percentage to the Marlins.

Nelson Baywill not take victory over Killarney Vale for granted on the Central Coast afterlosingeight of their past nine games, including a15.9 (99) to5.6 (36) defeat against Cardiff on Saturday.

The Marlins thrashed the Bombers in late June, but that was in Nelson Bay.

The Bulldogswill meet a City side with nothing to play for after Saturday’s 9.14 (68) to 9.11 (65) loss to Terrigal-Avoca on a windsweptNo.1 Sportsground.

“If there’s anyone who’s carrying a niggle, they’ll definitely be rested, but we’re not just going to rest guys for the sake of it,” Knight said.

“You want to try to get a full team on the park so you can start to play the footy you want to coming intofinals. A lot of teams rest players then find it difficult to switch it on when they need to.”

Based on recent results, City may prefer to face Nelson Bay in anelimination semi-final anyway.

“Warners Bay have been playing some good footy and pushed Terrigal the other week, so they’re full of confidence,” Knight said.

Terrigal wrapped up the minor premiership with Saturday’s win over their perennial rivals. They kicked fivegoals in the opening term to lead by 26 points before the Blues closed to within eight points at half-time.

Knight said it was hard to draw conclusions from the game as both sides had about four key players missing, including City’s Conor Haswell (hamstring strain).

“He might get up for this weekend, but we might give him another week off,” Knight said.“He plays a big role for us. He rebounds the footy and sets us up off the half-back. He takes a few grabs as well, cuts off a lot of possessions. He would have been pretty handy yesterday.

“The pleasing thing was they only kicked one goal after half-time, so our defence is obviously working well.”

The Bombers’ Scott Reed kicked five goals at Adelaide St to maintain a 32-27 lead at the top of the goalkicking charts over BulldogKayne Gibbs, who also booted five.

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Security specialists welcome domestic airport crackdown

01.14.2019, Comments Off on Security specialists welcome domestic airport crackdown, 苏州夜生活, by .

The Turnbull government’s consideration of a dramatic tightening of domestic airport terminals – which would introduce measures similar to those deployed for international flights – has been cautiously welcomed by aviation security experts.
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Following the disruption of what police have alleged to be the most serious terror plot ever hatched in , cabinet will consider new measures that would include identity checks for domestic passengers at boarding gates, full body scans and restrictions on liquids. Access to terminals could also be restricted to those holding boarding passes.

Infrastructure and Transport Minister Darren Chester told Fairfax Media “security measures are kept under constant review” to ensure they keep up with evolving threats.

“I will be relying on advice from our intelligence and security experts and won’t be speculating on potential changes to airport arrangements before they are properly considered by cabinet in consultation with the aviation industry,” he said.

After raids on properties across Sydney last weekend, police have said a would-be terrorist planned to attack an international flight by smuggling a bomb aboard inside check-in luggage. Khaled Khayat, 49, has been accused of communicating directly with an Islamic State operative in Syria.

A second alleged plot could have seen a toxic gas dispersed on a domestic flight, public transport or in another crowded public space.

John Coyne, head of the border security program at the n Strategic Policy Institute, said any new security measure had to be linked to mitigating a specific risk or threat.

“In this case, when we look through the list, they could potential be very helpful as long as they are linked to some sort of threat and they are part of a layered security system,” Dr Coyne said.

But he cautioned that forcing people through body scanners may not be necessary.

“Is there a significant improvement by bringing in a body scanner. I would probably argue not. There is a layer of security we already have to fill most of that role. Identity cards are another that are really controversial. To the general public, it makes sense…but then again that only works if it’s connected to a broader system,” he said.

He said the reason for passport checks in international travel was part of an international law enforcement system and questioned whether photo ID in domestic travel would be monitored or used in a a beneficial way. He contended there was no direct benefit from identifying a traveller as they board a flight.

Dr Coyne said there should be a comprehensive review of airport security.

Roger Henning, CEO of Homeland Security Asia/Pacific, said he was “absolutely in favour” of what the government was doing but cautioned that it wouldn’t completely address the threat.

“It’s only taken us 10 years to do it. Again, the emphasis is on bells and whistles – the technology. What these politicians don’t comprehend is that technology is a tool, not a total solution. Makes them look good, feel good to spend a couple of hundred million dollars but it is not a total solution.”

Mr Henning also questioned the necessity of extra body scanners and said that the employees working at airports – across retail, airlines, maintenance and other areas – should be trained and deployed as eyes and ears looking out for suspicious activity.

The measures being considered are similar to those imposed on domestic flights in the United States.

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Sydney terror arrests: One week on

01.14.2019, Comments Off on Sydney terror arrests: One week on, 苏州夜生活, by .

Police will decide on Sunday if they should charge, release or continue questioning the final man being held after a series of terrorism raids were carried out across Sydney a week ago.
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The raids allegedly uncovered two plots to target passenger planes flying from Sydney to the Middle East by placing an explosive or gas in checked baggage.

One plot was abandoned at the last minute on July 15, after an improvised explosive device was taken as far as the international terminal at Sydney Airport, the n Federal Police said on Friday.

It is alleged another plot was being planned when the raids were carried out. The plots were arranged by an Islamic State operative in Syria who sent bomb components to in air cargo, police said. International intelligence agencies intercepted communications from the operative.

Four men were arrested in sweeping raids across Sydney on Saturday, and homes in Surry Hills, Lakemba, Punchbowl, Wiley Park and Bankstown were searched through the week.

Police applied for a special order to question the men for seven days. The order is due to expire on Sunday evening, and only Khaled Merhi remains in detention.

Khaled Mahmoud Khayat???, 49, and his brother Mahmoud Khayat???, 32, were charged on Thursday with two counts each of acting in preparation for or planning a terrorist act, which carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.

Their case was briefly mentioned at Parramatta Local Court on Friday, where lawyers for the pair did not apply for bail. The case will return to court in November.

Abdul Merhi??? was released on Thursday night without charge, and his lawyer Moustafa Kheir said his client was “relieved the truth is out” after a “tough few days”.

“It’s just unfathomable that he would be associated with anything like this,” Mr Kheir said.

If police do not charge or release Khaled Merhi, they have the option to apply for a preventative detention order, a piece of terrorism legislation under which he could be held for a total of 14 days. The legislation can only be used if police believe a terrorist attack is imminent that could be prevented, or if they believe vital evidence will be lost after a terrorist act.

On Saturday, police were tight-lipped about which course of action they would take.

AFP Deputy Commissioner Michael Phelan on Friday described the July 15 plot where an explosive was packed inside a meat mincer and carried in luggage as “one of the most sophisticated plots that has ever been attempted on n soil”.

“With assistance from the IS commander, the accused assembled the IED … into what we believe was a functioning IED to be placed on that flight,” Mr Phelan said.

“At no stage did the IED breach security.”

Mr Phelan said the plot was possibly abandoned because the luggage was too heavy.

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Derelict home covered in warning signs sells for $1.26m

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Derelict home covered in warning signs sells for $1.26m, 苏州夜生活, by .

Domain SHD Auction of run down 239 Lilyfield Rd, Lilyfield, Sydney which sold for $1,260,000 by auctioneer Craig Marshall from Savills Cordeau on Saturday the 22nd of July, 2017 Picture by FIONA MORRIS Damaged walls, broken floors and a collapsing ceiling weren’t enough to deter buyers from a rundown home in Sydney’s inner west on Saturday.
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Ten groups registered to bid on the three-bedroom Lilyfield home, on the market for the first time in almost 30 years.

The long-held investment property at 239 Lilyfield Road was one of more than 503 Sydney homes scheduled to go under the hammer on Saturday. By evening, Domain Group had recorded a 70 per cent clearance rate from 324 reported auctions.

The house was divided into two separate residences. While the front part, tenanted until recently, was in decent condition, the back section was a different story.

“It’s shocking, I’ve never seen anything like it,” said one would-be buyer, as she passed through rooms marked with signs warning people to watch their step and mind their head.

The three back rooms, last home to a hoarder about five years ago, had fallen into a derelict state.

Despite the challenges of the home, it took just seconds for auctioneer Craig Marshall of Savills Cordeau Marshall to take an opening bid of $1 million.

Bidding on the 180-square-metre block jumped up in $50,000 and $25,000 increments until hitting the $1.2 million reserve. Related: Sweet slice of urban pie in LilyfieldRelated: Lilyfield lures in north shore familiesRelated: A Lilyfield home full of flavour

From there it went up in $10,000 and $5000 jumps, with five bidders making offers before the hammer fell at $1.26 million – $60,000 above reserve.

It was well above the $88,000 vendor David Adams bought the property for in 1988.

The Gladesville resident and his daughter, Jane Ramsey, were delighted with the result. “We were always hoping for $1.2 million, to get over that is just great,” said Mr Adams. “[Prices in Lilyfield] have gone off the charts.”

Selling agent Thomas Skelly, also of Savills Cordeau Marshall, said it was an entry-level property for the suburb. Lilyfield’s median house price, now at $1.73 million, has risen 22.1 per cent in the last year.

He said the effort and cost of the extensive renovations required put off many young buyers interested in the property.

“People were talking of spending anywhere from $100,000 to $800,000 to fix it up, depending on the scope of work they wanted to do to the place,” he said.

“It was a bit too overwhelming for [young buyers], it’s really for somebody who is not afraid of renovating.”

That person was the opening bidder, a buyer from nearby Rozelle, who did not wish to be identified.

She was delighted to nab the home – which will be her third renovation project – after missing out at several auctions. She plans to respectfully renovate it before moving in.

In nearby Glebe, a tightly held three-bedroom terrace owned by the same family for more than a century, sold for $1,666,000.

Despite six parties registering to bid on the 130-square-metre corner block, it came down to a two-man race for 1 Darghan Street.

After an opening offer of $1.2 million was knocked back for being too low, a vendor bid of $1.6 million was made.

From there bidding jumped to $1.62 million, then $1.63 million and $1.65 million. It then dropped to smaller $5000 and $1000 increments until it sold.

Selling agent Eleanor Fitzpatrick of Ray White Glebe said the buyers were a local family who planned to renovate the original-condition home before moving in.

In Surry Hills, there were roughly 140 bids for a modern three-bedroom terrace at 619 Bourke Street before it sold under the hammer.

Bidding on the 158-square-metre block started at $2 million and went up in $50,000 and $25,000 increments, quickly passing the $2.2 million reserve, as six of seven registered bidders vied for the keys.

By the time bidding reached about $2.45 million it was down to just two parties, who tried to outbid each other with $1000 jumps until the property sold for $2,551,000 – $351,000 above reserve.

The home, which records show last traded for $454,000 in 1996, sold through Chris Chung of McGrath Edgecliffe to a young family upsizing from Redfern. Elsewhere in Sydney…

87 King Street, Manly Vale NSW 2093.Photo: Supplied

SOLD $2.91 million Manly Vale 87 King Street 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 4 car spaces

This 1200-square-metre block broke the suburb record by $10,000. Bidding on the home, which last traded for $1.74 million in 2013, opened at $2.4 million. It went up in $50,000 increments, quickly reaching the $2.7 million reserve. A young family relocating from the inner west outbid six other groups to secure the house. It sold through Mike Dunn of Clarke & Humel Property. The previous suburb record of $2.9 million was set earlier this year by 50 Sunshine Street, which had DA approval for a subdivision.

40 Eastern Avenue, Kingsford. Photo: Supplied.

SOLD $3.29 million Kingsford 40 Eastern Avenue 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car spaces

More than 200 people gathered for the auction of this renovated Californian bungalow, which opened with a bid of $2.85 million. While bidding went up in $50,000 increments to start, it dropped down to $5000 jumps before the hammer fell, as two of six registered bidders competed for the home. It sold for $290,000 above the $3 million reserve, through Doreen Wilson of Phillips Pantzer Donnelley. Records show it last traded for $2.15 million in 2010.

96 North West Arm Road, Gymea. Photo: Supplied

SOLD $1,085,000 Gymea 96 North West Arm Road 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1 car space

An upsizing young family outbid four other registered groups to nab this tightly held home owned by the same family for several generations. The auction for the 910-square-metre block in a bush setting opened with an offer of $950,000. Bidding went up in $10,000 jumps before dropping to smaller increments. It sold for the reserve price through Luke Jeffree of Century 21 Jeffree Real Estate, who showed about 70 groups through the property.

13 Douglas Street, Stanmore NSW 2048.Photo: Supplied

SOLD $1,705,000 Stanmore 13 Douglas Street 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car spaces

It was a two-man race for this freestanding home which records show last sold for $1,111,000 just over four years ago. Bidding started at the $1.6 million price guide and went up in $20,000 and $10,000 bids, quickly passing the $1.65 million reserve. The property was snapped up by an investor, who bought the home for their young child to live in when they grow up. It sold through Michael Field of Belle Property Annandale. The vendors plan to upsize to another home in the inner west.

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Horn’s camp wants random drug testing as part of Pacquiao rematch

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Horn’s camp wants random drug testing as part of Pacquiao rematch, 苏州夜生活, by .

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The camp of WBO welterweight champion Jeff Horn will put random drug testing on the table as they continue negotiations for a rematch with Manny Pacquiao, with the second instalment increasingly likely to be held in in November.

After weeks of contemplation following his shock loss to the Queenslander at Suncorp Stadium in early July, the eight-division world champion looks certain to take up the option of a rematch, Top Rank’s Bob Arum telling Fairfax Media on Thursday that it was now just dates and venues holding up any announcement.

Horn returns to his Brisbane gym on Monday to begin training after a break following his victory over the Filipino great, who many thought would retire after losing a bloody and controversial unanimous decision through a dozen brutal rounds.

Horn’s trainer, Glenn Rushton, wasn’t entirely comfortable with the doping protocols for the first bout, which consisted of a standard post-bout urine sample. Neither fighter has ever returned a positive test.

But Rushton said they want to leave nothing to chance in the return, saying he would press the option of random pre-fight testing with promoters Duco Events before any deal was finalised. Drug testing has been an issue for Pacquiao in the past, most notably before his super fight with Floyd Mayweather. Even as recently as last month Mayweather was cagey when discussing Pacquiao and the notion of performance-enhancing drugs.

Rushton said they felt they would beat Pacquiao even more convincingly the second time, but he wants to ensure a level playing field for both men when they return to the ring for the sequel.

“It is something I’d bring up because what I don’t want is for them to go ‘The only way I can win this fight is if we are trying to get an unfair advantage’,” Rushton said. “I would certainly be very mindful of that. We want the big fights, but we want a level playing field.

“I’m very happy with any drug testing. I signed Jeff up for the WBC-VADA clean boxing program, which means you can be tested at any time. As an Olympian, we’re used to this sort of drug testing. We’ve had to do this many times. He’s clean as a whistle.

After hopes initially faded, with Horn calling out fighters such as Errol Spence on social media, the momentum for the rematch has grown in recent days. Arum has been speaking candidly and believes it will happen, with the fight likely to be Pacquiao’s final appearance in the ring as he juggles sport and his life as a Philippines senator.

Sydney and Melbourne are both in the running, even though the Queensland government has first and final rights of refusal. There had been reports of it taking place at Suncorp Stadium again, with giant air conditioners wheeled in to combat the heat, but Arum looks to have already ruled out any such move.

“We need to figure out where the fight will be,” Arum told ESPN. “The problem is we can’t have it outdoors again because of the weather [in Brisbane]. November is the summer there and it’s brutal to do it outdoors. We can’t do it. Even in July, which is their winter, it was pretty hot outdoors.”

Etihad Stadium remains a possibility, while Arum has been sweet-talked into a possible bout in Sydney by actor Nicole Kidman.

Rushton said he and Horn, who stands to make $2 million from the rematch, would be ready and waiting. “If we thought it was a fluke, we would be dodging it. But we’re saying let’s do it again, next time we’ll make it more convincing.

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The Aboriginal choir that took Germany by storm

12.12.2018, Comments Off on The Aboriginal choir that took Germany by storm, 苏州夜生活, by .

It’s not every day you see a group of 30-odd Aboriginal women in colourful dress on the streets of Melbourne. But then it’s not every day 30-odd Aboriginal women get to attend the world premiere of a movie in which they star.
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The Song Keepers is a remarkable and enormously enjoyable documentary about a rather improbable concert tour. In 2015, the Central n Aboriginal Women’s Choir went to Germany, to sing the hymns that had been brought to this country in the 19th century by Lutheran missionaries. And they sang them in their own languages, Pitjantjatjara and Arrarnta, to a rapturous response.

“It’s simultaneously contradictory,” says director Naina Sen of her debut feature, which turns all the easy assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and occupying cultures on their head. “You do have all the colonial stuff, but you also have this preservation of language, and sacred music, and a culture that already has sacred songs taking on another culture’s sacred songs.”

This choir is a relic, the last of a once-thriving scene. Lutheran missionaries translated 53 German hymns within three years of arriving in the outback in 1877, and those hymns were sung – religiously, you might say – by a plethora of choirs right up to the 1970s. But when the men drifted into country music, the choirs first became women-only and then began to dwindle.

By 2006, when choirmaster Morris Stuart arrived on the scene, the remnants of just a few were all that remained. A black man from British Guyana, he arrived hoping to introduce them to African freedom songs. Instead, they introduced him to their hymns.

“We’re taking them back to Germany, like a boomerang,” Morris says in the film of the 2015 trip. “But this time, encased in these Aboriginal languages.”

The singing in the film is joyous, the women frequently hilarious, but there are serious moments of reflection, too, that challenge the idea that Christian missions did more harm than good.

Theresa Nipper recalls being taken in by the wife of her mission’s pastor after she was rejected by the elders of her tribe for being the daughter of a white man. “People don’t understand,” she says. “They just think the missionaries came and took over, brought their God with them, the Bible and all that. But they don’t see the other side of the missionaries. They saved a lot of children’s lives.”

Daphne Puntjina talks of giving birth to a son after her husband was killed, and how the old women wanted to take the child and kill it, as was customary. But a government worker and his wife took her and the child in, cared for them, kept them safe.

“I’ve thought about this a lot in my life,” she says. “I still strongly value and practise my culture. I understand that was one law in the old days. We don’t practise this culture any more.”

But it is Pantjiti McKenzie who best summarises the duality that survives and thrives in these women and their choir. “My culture and my faith: I believe in both ways and it makes me stronger,” she says. “On Saturdays I take the young girls out bush. I teach them traditional dance and singing. And then later, the choir gets together to sing hymns in the church. I don’t feel like I have to choose between them. They’re both equally important to me. We stand by both.”

It’s powerful stuff that perhaps points a way forward even as it seeks to keep the past alive. And it’s every bit as uplifting and inspiring as any hymn, whether you’re a believer or not.

“This is a story about a group of exceptional women,” says Sen. “It’s about strength and hope and survival – of people, of culture, of language. And at the end of the day it’s a joyous celebration of these women taking culture back to its source – but on their own terms.”

The Song Keepers is at the Melbourne International Film Festival on Sunday at 3.30pm and on August 8 and 14. Details: miff苏州夜总会招聘.au The choir also performs at the Melbourne Recital Centre on Monday at 7.30pm. melbournerecital苏州夜总会招聘.au

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Newcastle rugby: Roos draw strength from miracle comeback against Hawks

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Newcastle rugby: Roos draw strength from miracle comeback against Hawks, 苏州夜生活, by .

DRAWING POWER: Caileb Gerrard steps through a tackle of Connor Mulhearn on the way to scoring a match-levelling try against Hamilton. Pictures: Stewart Hazell
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SOMEHOW Lake Macquarie found a way.

Down 37-16 to premiers and unbeaten leaders Hamilton with 18minutes remaining, the game –the Roos’season –appeared done and dusted.

The Hawks, seemingly, thought that too.

Roos’ revival draws praise TweetFacebook NHRU round 15Photos: Stewart Hazell, Michael HartshornThen Lake Macquarie lock Junior Osasa crashed over to cut the margin to 37-23 in the 72nd minute.

Two minutes later, Ken Villiamu crossed toclose within a converted try. Surely not.

With time up, fly-half Brendan Holliday went right only to find a dead end. He did a u-turn, glanced left and floated a “Hail Mary” pass. Centre Caileb Gerrard had to hurryto make the catch and all-off-a-sudden was in a hole. He burstthrough an attempted tackle by debut Connor Mulhearn and raced 20 metres to touch down.Holliday added the simple conversion to complete the great escape.

“I didn’t think we were a chance after being down by 20-odd,” Holliday admitted. “We did really well to fight back. I sawCaileb on the left and tossed it. It didn’t come out of the hand very well and floated too much. In the chaos, he was able to cut through. We were lucky really, but you can’t question the boys heart.”

The Roos, despite the grandstand finish, slipped out of the top five on percentages after Merewether thrashed University 52-34 at Townson Oval.Theymeetin a showdown for fifth place at Walters Park next Saturday.

After the Greens, the Roos have away games to Maitland and Nelson Bay.

Merewether tackleSouthern Beaches (home) and Hamilton (away).

The Waratahs, who trounced Singleton 52-22, are three points behind Merewether and Lake Macquarie and are the only other side with a realistic chance of moving into the five.They face Wanderers (a), Nelson Bay (h) and University (a).

If the Roos are to play in the finals for the first time since 2012, Holliday conceded thatthey must cut out the errors.

“When we string phases together we can match anyone,” Holliday said. “It is just the silly off-loads and the penalty count. We got killed in the penalties. That is obviously partly our fault.Once you get the roll against you in the penalties, they seem to keep coming.”

At half-time, Hamilton were in front 18-16 on the scoreboard and7-5 in the penalty. Twenty minutes into the second half the penalty count had ballooned to 17-6. Most of the penalties awarded by referee Brendon Farrar wereat the breakdown.

“It looked like it was a set of laws for them and one for us,”Lake Macquarie coach Tim Chidgey fumed.

Hamilton coach Scott Coleman was equally frustrated.

“Where is the consistency,” Coleman said. “A couple of weeks ago we had four penalties against us in a row and received two yellow cards. Today the penalty count at one stage was 17-6 and 10-1 in the second half and there was one yellow card.I will ask for clarification during the week.”

Coleman also had praise for Lake Macquarie.

“Full credit to them, they showed a lot of heart,” he said. “In the first half, wehad nine turnovers and seven were from knock-ons. They were mistakes but theopposition force that on you too. Hopefully we learned a lesson that we can’t switch off.”

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Peter Doohan farewelled at moving funeral at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Newcastle

12.12.2018, Comments Off on Peter Doohan farewelled at moving funeral at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Newcastle, 苏州夜生活, by .

UPDATED: Tennis legend Peter Doohan farewelled | PHOTOS Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebook Funeral service for n tennis legend Peter Doohan at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Hamilton, Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers HOW DOOHAN BECAME THE ‘BECKER WRECKER’

TRIBUTES FLOW FOR DOOHAN

IN his final weeks, as the insidious disease took hold of his body, Hunter tennis legend Peter Doohan clung to life so he could see his sons one last time.

So fittingly, at acelebration of Doohan’s life on Saturday, it was John and Hunter who toldthose packed into Sacred Heart Cathedral about a man who was much more than just the“Becker Wrecker”.

Doohan became an iconic underdog figure and a sporting legend in the Hunter when hefamously defeatedtwo-time defending champion Boris Becker at Wimbledon in 1987.

His decades of coaching made him a mentor to thousands of kids.

But off the court, he touched the hearts of those who met him.

John said his father was“awonderful, inspiring and hilarious man”.

Hunter spoke about his dad’s passion forthe Newcastle Knights, his love of INXS and his appreciation for“corny dad jokes”.

Doohan spent 20 years playing and coaching in the US, but returned toNelson Bay in 2009.

He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of Motor Neurone Diseasein May and given only months to live.

John and Hunter, as well as Doohan’s good matesPat Serretand Simon Robinson, his teammates at the University of Arkansas where Doohan was a NCAA champion, traveled to the Hunter in June to see him one last time.

“I truly believe that dad hung on with his life as hard as he could because he was looking forward to that trip so much,” John said.

“Pat and Simon left after a few days and Hunter and I spent two weeks with dad and had some incredible laughs and memories that we will both cherish forever.”

Father Brian Mascord, who told those gathered that Doohan had“whooped” him on the tennis court on more than one occasion, said the Hunter tennis great would be buried in a pair of“budgie smugglers”, a Knights singlet and a Knights blanket.

“That is loyalty,” Father Mascord said.

“And after Peter died the Knights won their first game in ages.

“When Peter comes to be canonised, that’s his first miracle.

“It has to be a miracle.”

With an n flag draped over his coffin, Doohan was carried from the cathedral and through a guard of honour, formed by some of his young tennis students, tennis racquets raised towards the sky.

EARLIER STORY:

HUNDREDS have turned out to farewell Hunter tennis legend Peter Doohan, who died last month after a brief battle with motor neurone disease.

Dubbed the“Becker Wrecker” after famously defeating two-time defending champion Boris Becker at Wimbledon in 1987, Doohan reached a career-high world ranking of 43.

He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of MND in May and given only months to live.

Doohan, who was living at Nelson Bay,died on July 21, aged 56.

Newcastle West’sSacred Heart Cathedral was packed with family, friends and fellow tennis players for a moving service on Saturday.

Doohan’ssons, John and Hunter, spoke of their father’s sense of humour, his love of the Newcastle Knights and his outstanding tennis career.

Father Brian Mascord, who told those gathered that Doohan had“whooped” him on the tennis court on more than one occasion, said the n tennis great would be buried in a pair of“budgie smugglers”, a Knights singlet and a Knights blanket.

“That is loyalty,” Father Mascord said.

“And after Peter died the Knights won their first game in ages.

“When Peter comes to be canonised, that’s his first miracle.

“It has to be a miracle.”

With an n flag draped over his coffin, Doohan was carried from the cathedral and through a guard of honour, formed by some of hisyoung tennis students with racquets in hand, outside.

Born in Newcastle,Doohan spent his formative years atMerewether High School, playing tennis at District Park in Broadmeadow on weekends under the guidance of coach Frank Brent.

After turning professional, he spent 20 years playing and coaching in the United States.

He was based inArkansas, where he went to university, was an All-Americanand twice wontheNCAAdoubles title.

Doohan returned to Nelson Bay in 2009 and coached up until June last year.

His victory over Becker in the second-round at Wimbledon in 1987 made him a household name in , but he was far from a one-match wonder.

He was unbeaten in the Davis Cup, won the South n Open singles title and reached No. 15 in the world indoubles, winning five titles during his distinguished career.

He was also the runner-up in the men’s doubles at the n Open in 1987, he and partnerLaurie Warder going down to SwedesAnders Järryd andStefan Edberg.

In lieu of flowers, Doohan’s family asked thata donation in Peter’s memorybe made at theService to Motor Neurone Disease Association of NSW.

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